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Re: *SPOILER ALERT* LET'S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIE!

Posted: Mon Jun 06, 2016 6:24 pm
by Snailhead
^ Thanks for sharing your perspective! One of the best things about Inland Empire is how much each viewing experience differs from the next - your post gives me hope that perhaps one day that scene might be among my favourites, ha.

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 5:24 am
by Xavi
My hopes are that Lynch continues the direction of his path in the cinematic/TV-world, from where he last left his footprints: INLAND EMPIRE. A film that will get the appreciation it deserves in the far far future. That piece of art is so heartbreaking profoundly and spiritually great that words come short.

All in all Twin Peaks Season 3 will be re-vo-lu-tio-na-ry.

Oh, and one more thing, I also hope that in 25 years people still don't quite get it ... Send in the Rabbits.

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:43 pm
by Rudagger
Xavi wrote:My hopes are that Lynch continues the direction of his path in the cinematic/TV-world, from where he last left his footprints: INLAND EMPIRE. A film that will get the appreciation it deserves in the far far future. That piece of art is so heartbreaking profoundly and spiritually great that words come short.

All in all Twin Peaks Season 3 will be re-vo-lu-tio-na-ry.

Oh, and one more thing, I also hope that in 25 years people still don't quite get it ... Send in the Rabbits.


God, I still really need to see Inland Empire (it's hard these days working up the nerve to start a three hour movie though, especially when it's apparently Lynch at his most .. Lynch-iest). That and The Straight Story are the only two of his I haven't seen.

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:13 pm
by Adolphus
Rudagger wrote:
Xavi wrote:My hopes are that Lynch continues the direction of his path in the cinematic/TV-world, from where he last left his footprints: INLAND EMPIRE. A film that will get the appreciation it deserves in the far far future. That piece of art is so heartbreaking profoundly and spiritually great that words come short.

All in all Twin Peaks Season 3 will be re-vo-lu-tio-na-ry.

Oh, and one more thing, I also hope that in 25 years people still don't quite get it ... Send in the Rabbits.


God, I still really need to see Inland Empire (it's hard these days working up the nerve to start a three hour movie though, especially when it's apparently Lynch at his most .. Lynch-iest). That and The Straight Story are the only two of his I haven't seen.

It helps if you can watch IE on a BIG screen- that is it helps in seeing into some of the dark corners- I've seen the film 4 times and I feel like I get a bit more of a grip on it each time i watch it- and yet...

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:58 am
by Dalai Cooper
Rudagger wrote:
Xavi wrote:My hopes are that Lynch continues the direction of his path in the cinematic/TV-world, from where he last left his footprints: INLAND EMPIRE. A film that will get the appreciation it deserves in the far far future. That piece of art is so heartbreaking profoundly and spiritually great that words come short.

All in all Twin Peaks Season 3 will be re-vo-lu-tio-na-ry.

Oh, and one more thing, I also hope that in 25 years people still don't quite get it ... Send in the Rabbits.


God, I still really need to see Inland Empire (it's hard these days working up the nerve to start a three hour movie though, especially when it's apparently Lynch at his most .. Lynch-iest). That and The Straight Story are the only two of his I haven't seen.


You're in for a treat, those are two of his best! Also both lynch at his lynchmost in their own ways.

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 9:37 am
by secretlettermkr
Rudagger wrote:
Xavi wrote:My hopes are that Lynch continues the direction of his path in the cinematic/TV-world, from where he last left his footprints: INLAND EMPIRE. A film that will get the appreciation it deserves in the far far future. That piece of art is so heartbreaking profoundly and spiritually great that words come short.

All in all Twin Peaks Season 3 will be re-vo-lu-tio-na-ry.

Oh, and one more thing, I also hope that in 25 years people still don't quite get it ... Send in the Rabbits.


God, I still really need to see Inland Empire (it's hard these days working up the nerve to start a three hour movie though, especially when it's apparently Lynch at his most .. Lynch-iest). That and The Straight Story are the only two of his I haven't seen.


INLAND EMPIRE is the re-invention of cinema. Is lynch returning to the way he made Eraserhead, only with decades of experience and aesthetics to condense and re imagine. Is pure cinema, done in a consumer digital mini dv camera. Is nerd prove, not a chance to be reduced to an explanation, simplification of its plot, beacuse IE is what it seems, shattered parts, fragmentation, PURE EMOTION AND IMAGINATION, and in my opinion is "LAURA PALMER GOES TO HOLLYWOOD", Its like ERASERHEAD meets FWWM trough Mullholand Drive and the Lost Highway. Its BEYOND cinema.... and Poland, and those Rabbits, they are the way in.

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 5:14 pm
by Snailhead
I adore INLAND EMPIRE, though it took a couple viewings for me to appreciate it as a whole. Also, if you're daunted by the 3 hour run time, I recommend watching it in sections. I know Lynch would hate me for saying that, but it's already such a fractured film that I don't mind breaking it up and watching it over a couple days.

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 5:46 pm
by Mr. Reindeer
Snailhead wrote:I adore INLAND EMPIRE, though it took a couple viewings for me to appreciate it as a whole. Also, if you're daunted by the 3 hour run time, I recommend watching it in sections. I know Lynch would hate me for saying that, but it's already such a fractured film that I don't mind breaking it up and watching it over a couple days.


It breaks up pretty nicely into three "parts," as well, like movements in a piece of music. (Although I do think it's best experienced by letting the whole thing wash over you in one sitting, it's not always practical to find that kind of time in my schedule.)

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:26 pm
by NormoftheAndes
Wowzer there's some really good viewpoints here on INLAND EMPIRE etc but what does any of this have to do exactly with the new Frost book? :)

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 10:08 am
by qbin2001
Xavi wrote:My hopes are that Lynch continues the direction of his path in the cinematic/TV-world, from where he last left his footprints: INLAND EMPIRE.


I hope... not.

Adolphus wrote:It helps if you can watch IE on a BIG screen


It didn't help at all.

Re: 'Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier' Novel by Mark Frost 10/31

Posted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 10:34 am
by secretlettermkr
qbin2001 wrote:
Xavi wrote:My hopes are that Lynch continues the direction of his path in the cinematic/TV-world, from where he last left his footprints: INLAND EMPIRE.


I hope... not.

Adolphus wrote:It helps if you can watch IE on a BIG screen


It didn't help at all.


:( :o :shock: :? 8) :lol: :roll:

Re: *SPOILER ALERT* LET'S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIE!

Posted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 2:58 pm
by mistahc
Just watched the movie for a second time. Here is my interpretation.

When Nikki starts rehearsing for the remake of the cursed screenplay, she starts to phase between reality and the world of the script. For example, there's the scene where she's telling Billy that her husband will kill them both, then says "this sounds like something from out of my script!" but then the director calls cut and we see the camera, and then Nikki has a disturbing realization that she was performing without realizing it. Actually, even before that we see Nikki and Billy talking for a bit before we see the camera crew, so it's already training the audience to question what they're viewing. And of course at the very end after Nikki is stabbed on the street, she returns back to the set.

While she's in the screenplay, Nikki starts taking on the persona of the character, living in that tiny house with her awful husband. When she is in her backyard at some point she asks two women if they have known her before and they start laughing; later, the Polish brunette is on a snowy street and asks the same question to the same two women, who respond the same way. I believe the latter scene is the original screenplay and the brunette is the original actress, and the former is Nikki in the remake screenplay (similar characters/events, different settings).

No idea about those rabbits. I loved whenever they were on screen, though - real spooky! I want to guess they are "evil" just because of the general tone when they are around, and also they disappear after the phantom is killed. It looked like they could have been "guarding" the brunette's room.

At the beginning, we saw the phantom taking a woman into a hotel room, then we keep seeing the brunette in what I think is a hotel room crying and watching the television. At the end, Nikki kills the phantom and then enters the brunette's room. The phantom had trapped the brunette in the hotel room, so when he dies, Nikki can free her. When they kiss it makes me think of a knight/damsel-in-distress situation. Remember when Nikki, while in the screenplay "world," told her husband that she was pregnant? And I think later when talking to the therapist-type character she says her son had died. With the phantom defeated, the screenplay is "rewritten" and the brunette can reunite with her now-loving husband and son.

My guess is that the dancers are various other women who have fallen victim to the screenplay/folktale phantom but have become jaded beyond saving, which is why they're depicted as prostitutes. I like to think of them collectively as a Cheshire Cat cat type of character (although less friendly) - they're familiar with the "wonderland" and communicate with the lost girl, but aren't above mocking or misdirecting her.