Episode 29

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David Locke
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Episode 29

Postby David Locke » Sun Nov 16, 2014 3:13 pm

Let's talk about that (in)famous final episode.

As much as people complain about Episodes 17-23 (though I'd say 24 isn't that good, either, and the real return of vitality to the show comes with Duwayne Dunham's superbly directed Episode 25), there's a kind of strange pleasure I get out of watching all those lackluster, lifeless and soapy episodes, and then watching the much better and more exciting -- if quite flawed -- Episodes 25-28, and then, finally, getting to Lynch's brilliant return to forum which closes everything out with a sickening, darkly funny but deadly serious BANG.

As soon as the episode begins you can tell a true master is behind the camera (with all due respect to the many talented TP directors). Nobody could shoot Peaks like Lynch, nobody could wring emotional or visceral performances and reactions out of every scene as he does (even the most cheesy or plain stupid material), and nobody could so effectively merge the mysterious inner-workings of the mind with the banality of quotidian waking life.

And so it is like a great shock of relief when the episode opens and (after possibly the only genuine or moving Lucy-Andy scene in the entire series) we see a typically Lynchian composition of Coop at the station, deep in thought, with a perturbed expression on his saintly visage. We're at a slightly high-angle now, and it's a wide and mostly static shot -- save for a couple of supremely elegant cutaways panning to Truman. The room is dimly lit by a small lamp or two, just the way Lynch likes: darkness, or something close to it. None of that flood of fake studio lighting as in most TV. And just as this scene is underway, and Lynch's credit appears as Hawk does, too, we realize that there is a new piece of music on the soundtrack: "Dark Mood Woods," one of Badalamenti's finest and most evocative works. Its eerie synth melody, which so strongly calls to mind some dark, dark, even evil force at work, is so compelling and fits so perfectly with the world of Twin Peaks that Lynch was moved to comment upon first hearing it that "everything, everything [that] I ever want to do is right there… right there in that music…" When we first hear the piece, too -- Badalamenti's first major TP composition in a while -- it is as if we know that Twin Peaks is back again, if only for one hour. But what an hour it is.

The tone of the episode has been oft-commented upon. Some deride it as unfairly angry, a kind of kick in the face to fans everywhere (though I would say that anger is much more squarely directed at ABC and/or the loss of quality control that shot a hole in Season 2). There certainly is the sense that, for the first time on this show, virtually every main character, especially the "good" and virtuous ones, get incredibly unhappy endings. Of course there's Coop/BOB. Annie may be dead. Ben Horne may be, too, but also the heretofore-saintly Doc Hayward has let his temper slip and may be guilty of murder. Even more cruelly, Audrey and Pete may be dead -- all while the evil Catherine sits back home cackling maniacally, one imagines. Nadine and Ed are put in a terrible situation when she "awakens," after which their marriage may not survive (and there's no guarantee Norma would take Ed back, either, after all that happens).

Generally, there is just a sinister feel in the air throughout the entire episode. The mere fact that Doc Hayward could be compelled to strike Ben as he does, and get into as much of a rage as he does (I can't barely recall him raising his voice before this), seems to me less a soap-ism borne out of the very soapy "Who's Donna's father?" plotline that propels this intense scene, and more of a consequence, however abstract, of the various negative energies bouncing around Twin Peaks that night (and the next). It's as if Windom attempting to access the Lodge creates some terrible gust of wind which swirls around the entire town, injecting violence and evil into even the most benign citizens.

In the end, this Season 2 finale is a kind of dark mirror of Frost's Season 1 finale. Both are stuffed with cliffhangers for almost every plotline, yet whereas Frost is a rationalist and so has people literally get shot, fall into comas, etc, Lynch is intuitive and works on a dream-logic level: so we get an undercurrent of sheer darkness which threatens to destabilize the town, and we have multiple characters whose mortal fates are left up in the air. Yet somehow the stakes feel much higher than in the first finale, maybe because human evil is nothing compared to BOB and the denizens of the Lodge.

There is something terribly "off" about every person or place in this episode, it seems. Whereas an hour like Lynch's shattering Episode 14 had foreshadowing of the surreal terror to come, but also lots of "regular" subplots that functioned like a breath of air in between the intense parts, in 29 it is as if a strange spell is cast in every scene throughout the entire episode. Nothing seems right, or ordinary. Look at how Lynch opens the Savings & Loan sequence with the grotesquely contorted, open-mouthed face of an old woman deep in sleep. It's as if he's telling us that the dreamspace will dominate the episode, that we are already inside the dream.

I have said nothing about the red room sequences, because I can't think of anything that can be said. In almost sadistically (yet compassionately) demolishing Twin Peaks, the town, and most of its goodness, in a way only rivaled by the TV-axing harshness of FWWM, Lynch created the finest episode of the very series he was forced to kill: it's the episode that feels the closest to an actual Lynch film, like FWWM, in how willfully subversive and indifferent to normal, logical concerns it is. Having this as the capper to the mediocre fluff that is mid-late Season 2 is like following up a dozen Bud Lights with five hits of strong acid. No wonder it comes as such a shock to the senses when watched in marathon-viewing. This is the Real Deal. Thankfully, there will be more of it soon. See You In 2 Years.
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Re: Episode 29

Postby LostInTheMovies » Sun Nov 16, 2014 3:56 pm

This is a wonderful read - yes, the kick of this episode is first and foremost, style. I agree with much of what you've written, and indeed that "five strong hits of acid after several Bud Lights" evokes exactly the weird feeling I get sinking into this episode. It's worth noting that this is unusual not just for Twin Peaks, but for Lynch; watch the pilot and finale back to back and it's jarring how bizarre and unsettling the latter is by comparison. The pilot feels like it belongs to the Blue Velvet stage of Lynch's work, where the surreal is just beneath the surface, occasionally bursting forth but even then mediated by a bit of distance (Jeffrey is more an observer than direct victim of Frank's mayhem, and when he becomes a victim we drift away). The finale points forward to Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive (not to mention Fire Walk With Me), where we are thrust headfirst into the uncanny. It also recalls Eraserhead, of course, but with less of a feeling of confinement: the Red Room is as free as it is dangerous.

An interesting thing about the episode's hostility, though, which does FEEL like it comes from Lynch (a measure of his commitment, I suppose) is that's its more deeply rooted in the teleplay written by Mark Frost, Harley Peyton, and Bob Engels, than in any changes Lynch made. Indeed, the stuff he added - the Log Lady helping Coop out, Ronette looking healthy and clean-cut, the warmth of the diner sequence with Shelly/Bobby in love and its affectionate callback to the pilot - actually gives the episode a dose of relief from all the darkness. Even Cooper's split - replacing a pure spiritual takeover on Bob's part - offers a measure of hope by preserving Cooper's good side in the Lodge. And apparently Lynch did not like the idea of ending with Cooper possessed by BOB although he delivers it with such ferocious panache. What's interesting about this is that Lynch's later films - when he remains in control - appear so much darker, and more skeptical of male heroic figures, than his earlier work. It's as if the forced pessimism of the series finale subsequently became ingrained in his creative DNA: as if he, like Coop, was taken over by darkness.
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David Locke
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Re: Episode 29

Postby David Locke » Sun Nov 16, 2014 5:06 pm

LostInTheMovies wrote:This is a wonderful read - yes, the kick of this episode is first and foremost, style. I agree with much of what you've written, and indeed that "five strong hits of acid after several Bud Lights" evokes exactly the weird feeling I get sinking into this episode. It's worth noting that this is unusual not just for Twin Peaks, but for Lynch; watch the pilot and finale back to back and it's jarring how bizarre and unsettling the latter is by comparison. The pilot feels like it belongs to the Blue Velvet stage of Lynch's work, where the surreal is just beneath the surface, occasionally bursting forth but even then mediated by a bit of distance (Jeffrey is more an observer than direct victim of Frank's mayhem, and when he becomes a victim we drift away). The finale points forward to Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive (not to mention Fire Walk With Me), where we are thrust headfirst into the uncanny. It also recalls Eraserhead, of course, but with less of a feeling of confinement: the Red Room is as free as it is dangerous.

An interesting thing about the episode's hostility, though, which does FEEL like it comes from Lynch (a measure of his commitment, I suppose) is that's its more deeply rooted in the teleplay written by Mark Frost, Harley Peyton, and Bob Engels, than in any changes Lynch made. Indeed, the stuff he added - the Log Lady helping Coop out, Ronette looking healthy and clean-cut, the warmth of the diner sequence with Shelly/Bobby in love and its affectionate callback to the pilot - actually gives the episode a dose of relief from all the darkness. Even Cooper's split - replacing a pure spiritual takeover on Bob's part - offers a measure of hope by preserving Cooper's good side in the Lodge. And apparently Lynch did not like the idea of ending with Cooper possessed by BOB although he delivers it with such ferocious panache. What's interesting about this is that Lynch's later films - when he remains in control - appear so much darker, and more skeptical of male heroic figures, than his earlier work. It's as if the forced pessimism of the series finale subsequently became ingrained in his creative DNA: as if he, like Coop, was taken over by darkness.

Thanks! Yeah, the Pilot has a fairly restrained quality, aesthetically -- it's still Lynchian, but it feels more classical in style. It's only with the Red Room dream that the show would start to pick up a more expressionist and truly surreal aspect, though even that didn't fully bloom until Season 2. And the finale does indeed bring to mind the later works -- maybe especially Lost Highway, with the male hero left in a doomed state and the generally dour and dark tone. You're quite right to point out the instances of lightness which contrast with the rest of the ep, and which Lynch created himself; I guess I just see them as so small in number and screentime that the darkness of the rest kind of drowns it out (just like Jacoby escorting Sarah to deliver that chilling line to Briggs in the diner drowns out the moments of happiness shared between couples just a few moments before in the same place). 29 is unrelentingly dark, and that's why it reminds of Lost Highway as well as Eraserhead more than the Pilot or Blue Velvet (which ends with some kind of happiness). FWWM narrowly escapes from being the most bottomlessly dark Lynch creation, which it certainly is for most of its run, just for the sheer beauty and catharsis of its ending with Laura, the angel and Coop.

Yes, well said; even if Lynch resisted the conclusion forced on him, it does FEEL like he nevertheless saw something of value in it to direct it with such conviction, perhaps was entranced by the sheer darkness of it. 29 is most remarkable for the lack of typical Lynchian "contrast": the angel, the robins, the happy ending where even those good souls find some kind of peace in death... it's that blindingly upbeat or even joyful element which stands in stark contrast to the darkness and makes Lynch relatively unique. But like Lost Highway, the finale has very little of that -- I'd say that what there is isn't nearly on the level of the good, virtuous elements that shine through his other films. So this, I think, is what makes the episode appear especially dark and nightmarish.

And what may account for the return to the all-out surrealism of Eraserhead, with the Red Room sequences, is the almost improvised manner in which they were shot. When you've got half an episode's worth of script put in the trash, a relatively small budget and just virtually one location, the solution for most filmmakers is either have a lot of dialogue/interesting conversations, or to go into the abstract. It seems that circumstances allowed Lynch to do exactly the latter, and maybe he liked it so much, felt it so freeing, that it prompted his subsequent more unconventional pictures. ABC giving TP the middle finger may have made Lynch only more interested in getting further away from what would be "acceptable" to studio executives or average viewers. Maybe the aftermath of TP is why FWWM and LH feel like his most "who gives a fuck?" works; not quite the same thing as "most personal," but similar, in that it's just a lot of cinematic ideas that he liked and didn't care if anyone else did. I guess Inland Empire is the ultimate expression of that, though!...
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Re: Episode 29

Postby LostInTheMovies » Sun Nov 16, 2014 5:29 pm

David Locke wrote:I guess Inland Empire is the ultimate expression of that, though!...


Yes, Inland Empire is the (il?)logical conclusion of the direction he'd been heading in since the Twin Peaks finale. Which makes me wonder what is in store for 2016? Something of a return to more restrained filmmaking? Something avant-garde and alienating, but in a different way than IE? I really like the eerie, spaced-out feel of The Missing Pieces - similar in some ways to the more minimalist/extended sequences in ep. 14 & 29: long takes, master shots, long, long, awkward quiet stretches. Even the craziness of the Convenience Store sequence felt kind of "unblinking" in a weird way (especially compared to FWWM with all its cross-dissolves and static overlays). I look forward to being surprised.
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Re: Episode 29

Postby LostInTheMovies » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:36 pm

Given the discussion here, thought others may find this amusing. It was written - er, discovered in the trash outside Lynch/Frost Productions - by one Darragh Nagle back in 1991, who then shared on the alt.tv.twin-peaks boards. Long, but hilarious.

*

(Found in the trash bin behind Lynch/Frost productions:)

The finale - Version 4

Bob is standing beside the entrance to the Black Lodge. Andy comes up to him with a cup of coffee. Andy trips, falls, spills the coffee onto Bob. Bob: I'm MELTING!!!!! MELTING!!!! AAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhh

Bob disappears into the oily puddle.

Andy: Well, I guess good always triumphs over evil!

Cooper walks up.

Coop: Good work Andy!

Coop pats andy on the back.

Andy: Agent Cooper, I found that evil murderer you asked me about, Windom Earle, so I put him in the jail cell for you.

Coop gives Andy the thumbs up sign.

Coop: Andy, you're allright!

Pete walks up.

Pete: Hi guys! Guess what? Audrey's getting married to that jet pilot fellow.

Coop: really?

Pete: Yep. I sure hope he takes her fishing from time to time, she's such a dear heart!

Andy: I'm sure they will make a lovely couple.

Coop: Yes, I'm sure they will. Marriage is both strange and wonderful. Sherriff Truman walks up.

Truman: Well guys, I had to break up a little fight at Ed & Nadine's, but everything is back to normal now. Seems that Nadine is back to normal, and so Ed and Nadine can get on with their life now.

Andy: But what about Norma?

Truman: They're going to marry her too. She'll live with them.

Andy: Oh. (looks thoughtful)

Cut to Hayward living room. Ben Horne is in the living room with Doc Hayward and Mrs. Hayward. Donna walks in.

Donna: You!

Ben: Yes, Donna, I wanted to be good. I had to tell them. I'm actually James's father!

All: AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!

Cut to the log lady's home:

Log Lady: Well, here goes!

She pours an oily substance all over the log. There is a little smoke, then a huge flash of light, and she is holding in her arms: The Log Man!!! (Try to get Arnold Schwartzenegger for this role!)

Log Man: Hi Honey, I'm home! (smiles)

Cut to the Double R:

Bobby and Shelley are leaning over the counter talking.

Bobby: Let's get married!

Shelley: Ok!

Bobby: But what about LEO?

Shelley: I got a judgement against him for divorce, by default, He never even showed up!!!

Bobby: Wow, Shelley, Wow!

Cut to TV set:

Chet: Jade, I'm so glad we came out of this okay!

Jade: Oh, Chet! But what happened with Emerald?

Chet: She and Montanna are opening up a diner in a faraway town, they won't bother us again!

Jade: Oh, Chet! (They embrace)

Camera pans back to reveal bedroom, and in the bed, Leo, with a cup of coffee and a piece of cherry pie, smiling, and next to Leo, Heidi! Heidi takes a bite from her donut.

Cut to The Great Northern Lobby:

The giant walks up to the desk.

Giant: If you tell me the price for a room, then can I believe you?

Clerk: Of course sir. This is a high class joint! Front!

Little man from another place walks up wearing bellboy's uniform. He grabs the giant's bag.

LMFAP: Waulk theeeeese waaaaaay! (smiles, rolls eyes around)

LMFAP starts walking to the beat of the jazz music, snapping his fingers with his free hand, dancing toward the room. The giant looks amazed, then starts following, doing the same dance.

Cut to the Sherriff's Department.

Lucy: Now that I've decided that you will be the father, we can start buying the wardrobe for the baby!

Andy: Lucy, will you marry me?

Lucy: Oh, Andy, yes!

Lucy and andy kiss over the counter, Hawk walks through, notices them, and shakes his head slightly while he continues walking.

Cut to the Double R:

Agent Cooper walks in.

Cooper: Norma! You're looking good! Nice to see you! Major Briggs, I have the most amazing things to tell you about the green butt skunk! Have you been fishing lately?

Annie: Well hello there!

Coop: Hi Annie. (pauses) Annie: I've been doing alot of thinking lately, and it has become clear to me that I've been focusing beyond the edges of the board too long, and that when a man can't picture the necessity for life as it should be and the beauty of a douglas fir or making love with a beautiful woman you feel genuine affection for, that the whole universe can be changed somehow.

Annie passes out, crashes to the floor.

Coop whips out pocket recorder.

Coop: Diane, what ever did happen to the balanced national budget?

Norma picks up Annie, starts reviving her.

Coop: How's Annie?

Norma: She'll be fine.

Coop: Good.

Coop joins Norma with Annie, Annie comes around

Coop: Annie, will you marry me?

Annie: Oh, yes! I accept!

Coop: (smiles) Then our adventures are just beginning! Come on everybody! There's going to be a group wedding at the roadhouse!

Briggs: Agent Cooper, there's been one thing I've been meaning to ask you.

Coop: Yes major, what is it?

Briggs: I've been wondering about this for a long time now, and so I have to ask you: Are cherry pies really enough?

Coop: Only if you get three pieces. With coffee.

Laura Palmer walks in.

Laura Palmer: Hi everybody, I'm back!

All: Where have you been?

Laura Palmer: I had the strangest dream, I dreamed I died. And you were there, and you, and you, and you! But, everything's fine now, so I'll be back in school on Monday.

Everybody smiles and nods approval.

Roll credits, background sun setting over Twin Peaks. An owl is seen flying out of town, it passes the camera view on its way out.
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Re: Episode 29

Postby MoondogJR » Tue Nov 18, 2014 1:03 pm

The final episode is my absolute favourite one! I really liked reading the posts above! Great writing!

There is one thing however, that always bothered me about this episode and that is the fact that doc Hayward is with Cooper and Harry in the final scene. I'm sure this has been discussed before. It never made much sense to me. I mean, as far as we know he killed a man the night before. What happened and why isn't he held in prison for questioning? Does his appearance in this scene mean that Ben isn't dead (I always hoped he's not) and they just kinda sorted things out? That doesn't seem very likely...

I can't help but think that Lynch decided to have Hayward there for a reason. But I never really figured out why... I mean, he directed the hayward-attacks-Ben-scene as well, so clearly was aware of the impact of that event on the character.

This beeing said: I absolutely LOVE this episode! :)
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Re: Episode 29

Postby Frketson » Tue Nov 18, 2014 6:14 pm

MoondogJR wrote:There is one thing however, that always bothered me about this episode and that is the fact that doc Hayward is with Cooper and Harry in the final scene. I'm sure this has been discussed before. It never made much sense to me. I mean, as far as we know he killed a man the night before. What happened and why isn't he held in prison for questioning? Does his appearance in this scene mean that Ben isn't dead (I always hoped he's not) and they just kinda sorted things out? That doesn't seem very likely...

I can't help but think that Lynch decided to have Hayward there for a reason. But I never really figured out why... I mean, he directed the hayward-attacks-Ben-scene as well, so clearly was aware of the impact of that event on the character.


Yeah I think its because Ben didn't die. I mean we have no way of knowing for sure but I would have assumed Ben would be back for a season 3.
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Re: Episode 29

Postby Jonah » Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:47 pm

Just finished watching this one. It's definitely the most surrealistic and darkest episode of the show, a true phantasmagoria of visceral images and emotions, unlike anything I've ever seen before--or since--on TV.

The Doc Hayward thing (goof? mistake? inconsistency? none of the above?) doesn't bother me as much as the clear inconsistency with Norma. At least with Doc Hayward, you could argue that Ben's fall and wound looked worst then they were - and he survived and is fine. They could've even explained this away as such if they had done a Season 3 back then. But Norma smiling and laughing, looking so happy and clicking her fingers/almost dancing with Ed is not so easy to explain. There's just been chaos at the Miss Twin Peaks festival and her little sister has been kidnapped by a vicious murderer. Yet...she is not only completely unconcerned, but deliriously happy. This has to be considered a goof, surely? I suppose you could argue it's part of the air of negative/dark energy in the town that night mentioned by David Locke above - that it's gotten to Norma, too, erasing her worry for her sister's fate and letting her marinate only in her feelings for herself and Ed. But I don't know, I still think it's out of sync and an oversight. The scene would have played better IMO if Ed had been consoling her and she seeming so grateful for his support. Not only would this have fit the narrative of events but possibly added more heartbreak and resonance to Nadine snapping back to reality - and Norma seeing with horror that on top of everything else, she now has this to deal with, too.

Nonetheless, a thoroughly amazing episode. I actually think the red room sequences are better here than they are in Episode 3 or even FWWM. Just stunning and very frightening. Great to see Maddy and Leland again, too!

One last thing I noticed on this latest rewatch on Blu-Ray, having not seen the show in a couple of years. Look closely as Cooper enters the red curtains in Sycamore Grove. I always assumed he was parting them as Windom Earle did not long earlier. But there seems to be something odd about this sequence. It almost looks like he is using his right arm to part them, but then he begins to step through and it's clear his arm is down by his side. Maybe I'm overthinking this and it's just the special effect is a little off, but what I got from this was either: 1. Coop is parting the curtain, then something else takes over. Or 2: Coop doesn't part the curtains at all. Someone or something else (perhaps even the red room itself if not one of its many inhabitants) is opening the curtains, beckoning him inside, which makes it all the more eerie. As he steps through, arm down by his side, the curtain keeps drifting up and up on the righthand side, then falls with a snap. I never noticed this before. I don't know, as I said, maybe I'm overthinking it, but it added an even eerier element to the episode this time around. And would make a lot of sense as it's often been deduced that the red room always wanted him. I've even seen some theories online that state it called him to Twin Peaks in the first place.
Actually, now that some time has passed, I like "The full blossom of the evening".
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Re: Episode 29

Postby BOB1 » Thu Jan 29, 2015 11:32 am

Another great insight.
You're totally right about Norma. It's actually so strange that having seen the episode I don't know how many times (20?), I never even thought about it!

that it's gotten to Norma, too, erasing her worry for her sister's fate and letting her marinate only in her feelings for herself and Ed. But I don't know, I still think it's out of sync and an oversight. The scene would have played better IMO if Ed had been consoling her and she seeming so grateful for his support. Not only would this have fit the narrative of events but possibly added more heartbreak and resonance to Nadine snapping back to reality - and Norma seeing with horror that on top of everything else, she now has this to deal with, too.

I agree with every word. Definitely oversight. If there's any explanation at all that might work for me, it'd be that Norma didn't know about Annie. There was a lot of mess, police was all around but I wouldn't think the police made it public that Windom took Annie and she's missing.
All in all it seems that for this episode Norma had her own plot, Annie had her and the fact that they were sisters was forgotten.
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Rami Airola
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Re: Episode 29

Postby Rami Airola » Sat Jan 31, 2015 8:18 pm

Does anyone else hear a short sample of Laura's scream when Cooper hits his head in the mirror?

To my ears, it sounds exactly as if there was a small bit cut from Laura's Doppelganger's scream in the Red Room and inserted into the moment the mirror breaks.


Or am I just hearing my own things?
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Re: Episode 29

Postby BOB1 » Sun Feb 01, 2015 3:44 am

You're hearing my things, too!

I don't know what it means but it's hugely impressive.
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Re: Episode 29

Postby OK,Bob » Sun Feb 01, 2015 7:42 pm

Rami Airola wrote:Does anyone else hear a short sample of Laura's scream when Cooper hits his head in the mirror?

To my ears, it sounds exactly as if there was a small bit cut from Laura's Doppelganger's scream in the Red Room and inserted into the moment the mirror breaks.


Or am I just hearing my own things?

I hear SOMETHING familiar mixed in there, and wouldn't be surprised. Earlier in the episode, I'm almost certain that Josie's drawer-pull-wailing is mixed into the squeak of the truck door closing as Earle is about to lead Annie to the grove.
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Re: Episode 29

Postby OK,Bob » Sun Feb 01, 2015 7:45 pm

From David Lynch's "Ronny* Rocket" script:

GIRL
I got idea, man...you take me for a
walk ( she moves closer to the guy)
under the sycamore trees (closer)
the dark trees that blow, baby. In
the dark trees I'll see you and you'll
see me...I'll see you in the branches
that blow in the breeze...I'll see you
under the trees.

GUY
I'll twist your neck.

GIRL
NO, NO, NO, NO you won't...I'll
run away from you.

GUY
I'll catch you...I'll catch you
in the dark trees and kill you.


[*sic; a later draft is titled "Ronnie Rocket"]
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Re: Episode 29

Postby The Dream Man » Sun Mar 01, 2015 8:24 pm

Right after Sarah Palmer tells Maj. Briggs her message and we see Dale walking down the hallway, according to Netflix the LMFAP says "I'm waiting for you." Is that really from the LMFAP? It sounds nothing him.
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Re: Episode 29

Postby Jasper » Mon Mar 02, 2015 2:59 am

OK,Bob wrote:From David Lynch's "Ronny* Rocket" script:

GIRL
I got idea, man...you take me for a
walk ( she moves closer to the guy)
under the sycamore trees (closer)
the dark trees that blow, baby. In
the dark trees I'll see you and you'll
see me...I'll see you in the branches
that blow in the breeze...I'll see you
under the trees.

GUY
I'll twist your neck.

GIRL
NO, NO, NO, NO you won't...I'll
run away from you.

EARLE (to Annie)
You’ll not run from me now. Not in this circle of trees.

Image

The Dream Man wrote:Right after Sarah Palmer tells Maj. Briggs her message and we see Dale walking down the hallway, according to Netflix the LMFAP says "I'm waiting for you." Is that really from the LMFAP? It sounds nothing him.


It's Windham Earle, and this might lend support to the theory that Briggs would have attempted to rescue Cooper from the lodge.
Last edited by Jasper on Tue Mar 03, 2015 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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