Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group

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yaxomoxay
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby yaxomoxay » Tue Oct 10, 2017 11:18 am

Kilmoore wrote:
yaxomoxay wrote:That’s not true.

Bloody hell. Am I really going to have to rewatch the whole thing? You've certainly laid out a case for it.



No worries, there are tools to help you with that :)

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I'm going to need a bit of time to let go of the cynicism I currently hold for the season, but maybe one day.


Usually time heals. Worst case scenario you won’t care for the series at all. Just enjoy what you like, life is short :)


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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby The Gazebo » Tue Oct 10, 2017 1:50 pm

Good post, Mr. Reindeer, and your reading of it all seems entirely plausible. Thanks.

Despite my rather constant whining these past couple of months, I still haven't been able to tie everything together into a coherent criticism. If the show had been all bad, then it wouldn't have been a problem. But of course it wasn't. There are moments I would watch again and again, while during others I secretly hoped for a reintroduction of labor camps for artists and intellectuals. In sum, it was a rollercoaster, but one where I felt more nauseous than thrilled, and I'm not really sure I'll ever be able to fully explain exactly why this was such a disappointing experience.

Mr. Reindeer wrote:I’ve thought about this too. As someone who entered the season hoping for a largely nostalgia-free “2017 Lynch” experience — whatever that might entail — I have to say that I was completely unprepared for how little we got of Dale in the town of Twin Peaks. His love affair with the town was THE driving force of the original show, and it does feel like a bit of a missed opportunity, or even a taunt, that we didn’t get to revisit that — even from a darker perspective with the doppel visiting the diner, etc. Unlike some other choices made in the course of S3, I don’t think this was a case of external circumstances influencing storytelling choices. For instance, certain character arcs were undeniably informed to one degree or another by limited actor availability. Beymer, Tamblyn, Fenn, Lipton and DPK pretty clearly shot all their scenes in a few days with very few set/location changes and minimal interactions with other cast members. While that aspect of things is a little distracting, and highlights what some in this thread are calling the “sketch show” nature of the season, I accept it as part of the reality of L/F bringing to life a miracle none of us thought was possible. I think it will even become part of the show’s charm, just as many of S2’s quirks and flaws have for many. However, the lack of Cooper in the town of Twin Peaks feels like something different. Kyle’s availability throughout the production seems to have been pretty wide open, and his seemingly limited presence during the Washington shoot strikes me as more a creative choice than a logistical one. But why?


I think they made a few creative choices - or overall premises - that ultimately dictated most of what followed.

1. The decision to explore ideas unrelated to the show at large (obviously not a crime in itself), and to move out of town.
2. Lynch's desire to work with his long-time favourites (MacLachlan, Watts, Dern, Stanton). Put number 1 and 2 together, and the cynics among us will feel that Lynch just waited for this opportunity to make something for himself and his close friends, with the town and story of Twin Peaks being like a fifth wheel.
3. Frost's massive expansion of the mythology.

Then there were others, like the decision to film on location as opposed to a studio (which you touch upon yourself). Initially I thought this was excellent, but as it turned out, once they decided to have a cast of about 12 trillion people, this probably necessitated the cameo feel of most scenes. By the way, this is one part of the creative process I'm really eager to know more about. Was keeping everything a secret the main driving force in the casting and filming, or was it a conscious choice to make the spiderweb of itsy-bitsy characters as large as possible?

Finally, there were obviously some major obstacles to overcome in terms of personnel. Bob, Man from Another Place, Major Briggs, Laura, Leland, Jeffries, etc. Nevertheless, they did decide to build parts of the story around these. I must say I was pretty impressed with what they managed to get from Coulson and Ferrer. As for why MacLachlan was kept away from the town for so long, well, I'm pretty sure Frost's Q & A's during his book tour might last for hours if the attendance is anything like us in here :D

Mr. Reindeer wrote:I think L/F certainly understood the expectations, and deliberately subverted them to convey whatever it is they were getting at (“you can’t go back” seems like the obvious theme, but I do think it’s a bit more nuanced than that — maybe “you can’t go back, but if you do and rely on a dude in a green glove to clean up your mess, be prepared to become a superimposed disembodied head and then to be transported to an alternate reality”?). The Sunset Blvd. clip reminds us that Norma Desmond’s dream of “the old team back together” is a sad, impossible delusion, and I don’t think it’s a coincidence that DKL let that line play directly before the reference to Gordon Cole and the events leading to Cooper’s awakening.


Yeah, I can see this point of view. However, if my aforementioned suspicions have an ounce of truth in them, this was just collateral damage in the wake of Lynch's wet dreams. I don't particularly appreciate those (not you, Sir) who retrospectively say that this was the only way it could have been done. No, the past is the past, but many of the local characters could have been given a lot more to work with. Bobby's story and development is probably one of the decent exceptions here.

Mr. Reindeer wrote:Most of L/F’s narrative subversion choices in S3 (Dougie, Audrey, Part 18, the various standalone vignettes/slices of life) work for me like gangbusters. But that whole sheriff’s station sequence in Part 17 is just kind of bewildering. As I’ve outlined above, I think I kind of understand what they were trying to get across, and I respect it in concept. But in execution...eek. My heart sank to my feet on first viewing, and it’s a testament to how strong the back half of Part 17 and Part 18 were that L/F won me back.


I liked 17/18 to a certain degree (with the exception of Green Glove), but I still haven't rewatched anything since the finale. Once I realized that most earlier plot threads were left hanging, starting all over again became a lot less tempting. Dougie never appealed to me, but I was hoping that something would make it worthwhile. "Whoosh, I'm back" was not exactly what I had in mind. I think what it boils down to is this: The things I couldn't connect with - mainly Dougie, the expanded mythology and the flat, daytime feel - became too dominant, instead of being minor annoyances.
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Joe McCluskey » Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:04 pm

yaxomoxay wrote:
Kilmoore wrote:Except that the Fireman pulled a fast one on him and sent him elsewhere, so there was never any threat from Mr. C to the main characters. He was just a pawn in a game we can't understand, and therefore pointless to the story.


That’s not true. The Fireman’s plan needed some events to happen in a precise order. The trap was successful only because Andy was ready for it (also Bobby, Hawk, and Sheriff Truman were somewhat ready). They had to go through understanding the duality of Cooper, and they had to make some experiences that allowed them to understand it. From the weird insurance guy at the beginning, to an exploration of the Lodge, it was all a long investigative voyage.
The TP Sheriff’s group did a throughout investigation which was not merely procedural. It did start procedurally, trying to find some evidence that was allegedly missing from 25 years prior, but then they had to get to know stuff that that wasn’t in their jurisdiction, so to speak.
You know, in real life it’s not easy to believe in doppelgangers, and a Major that travels in time and plants clues all around in order to save a guy who’s actually two guys but he’s one.
If you find a piece of paper with “SMITH/SMITH” written on it you are not going to believe that there are two agents by the name Smith which are the same person but two different people at the same time. Mr. C was simply delayed by the Fireman; he arrived in TP, he arrived near the Palmer’s house. The trap worked because Mr C. was not aware that the Sheriff’s group had enough information to understand who he really was. That’s why we probably have a glance of what it could’ve been if they were not ready (when the Firemen shows Lucy to Andy in that strange vision that never happens). Let me point this out: if goodCoop had arrived to save the day, THEN the Sheriff’s plot would’ve been useless.
The Fireman also needed Cooper to be ready at the exact time. He had to make the phone call to Sheriff Truman (and Lucy!) at that precise moment. Not earlier, not later. We can go on and on and trace it back 25 years. In other words, the trap was not moving Mr. C’s direction (or, not only that) but setting up an entire system that could halt, trap, fight and kill BOB. This included changing people’s belief systems, including Lucy’s which HAD to understand cell phones.

I will repeat this ‘till the day I die (and enter the Black Lodge). After watching the whole thing in a sitting, I see how reasoning by episode # really alters the flow of the movie. Once the flow gets going, the continuous need for a payoff vanishes completely. I feel that watching one or two episodes is like watching one or two scenes of S1E1 one week apart. I seriously can’t think of watching this thing in any other way than a full sitting (maybe two, two days in a row). It changed even my opinion of Becky, a character I could not stand before and that now I appreciate quite much.

The Sheriff's station plot didn't really serve any purpose, like many other aspects of the show. Out of curiosity, they looked into some clues that popped up--e.g., Laura Palmer's diary pages, Major Brigg's notes, etc. But all of this goes nowhere, as they don't apply any of this information in a meaningful way.

They are under some impression that there might be two Coopers, but they don't have any way of knowing that Evil Cooper is not the real deal when he arrives at the station in Part 17. Sheriff Truman never met Cooper before, so he wouldn't know if Cooper is acting odd, and Andy, someone who once knew Cooper, immediately accepts that it's the real Cooper when he approaches him. "Hawk & Bobby were somewhat ready"? They didn't do anything other than silently spectate from the sidelines. Also, Truman is completely bewildered during the phone call with Cooper, as he doesn't pull out his gun until after Evil Cooper draws his weapon, so his "understanding of the duality of Cooper" doesn't come into play here either.

Andy wasn't ready either for what was happening, despite having a lengthy scene where he receives knowledge from the Fireman. He did absolutely nothing with that information he acquired. The only reason Evil Cooper was shot was because of the phone call they received from Good Cooper, rather than the people in the Sheriff's station having knowledge of the situation at hand.

Cooper could have called the Sheriff's station anytime between waking up from coma & driving to Twin Peaks, and it would have the same effect. The only reason the phone call takes place when it does is for dramatic effect, rather than it being part of some super complex, precise plan with the Fireman.
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Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby yaxomoxay » Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:36 pm

Joe McCluskey wrote:The Sheriff's station plot didn't really serve any purpose, like many other aspects of the show. Out of curiosity, they looked into some clues that popped up--e.g., Laura Palmer's diary pages, Major Brigg's notes, etc. But all of this goes nowhere, as they don't apply any of this information in a meaningful way.

They are under some impression that there might be two Coopers, but they don't have any way of knowing that Evil Cooper is not the real deal when he arrives at the station in Part 17. Sheriff Truman never met Cooper before, so he wouldn't know if Cooper is acting odd, and Andy, someone who once knew Cooper, immediately accepts that it's the real Cooper when he approaches him. "Hawk & Bobby were somewhat ready"? They didn't do anything other than silently spectate from the sidelines. Also, Truman is completely bewildered during the phone call with Cooper, as he doesn't pull out his gun until after Evil Cooper draws his weapon, so his "understanding of the duality of Cooper" doesn't come into play here either.

Andy wasn't ready either for what was happening, despite having a lengthy scene where he receives knowledge from the Fireman. He did absolutely nothing with that information he acquired. The only reason Evil Cooper was shot was because of the phone call they received from Good Cooper, rather than the people in the Sheriff's station having knowledge of the situation at hand.

Cooper could have called the Sheriff's station anytime between waking up from coma & driving to Twin Peaks, and it would have the same effect. The only reason the phone call takes place when it does is for dramatic effect, rather than it being part of some super complex, precise plan with the Fireman.


I don't see how this view can be held in any way whatsoever, especially that what they find goes nowhere. First one of the dept. members accepts a message from a log, after a visit to a surreal place this member begins his true investigation, involving other people. Then he finds an important piece of evidence that is from a girl who died 25 years ago and somewhat it talks about a dude who's trapped. Then they visit the wife of a guy that traveled in time to find an object that tells them where to go and when, while reiterating the fact that there are two Coopers. They go and find not only an eyeless lady but also a vortex to a different dimension (if you will) where one of the team finds out the purpose of what is happening. Thanks to that not only things are prepared for Mr. C's arrival, but they work as they should. You say that Cooper could've called earlier or at any point, but you forget that Mr. C is not dumb. If the Sheriff and the other guys knew on sight that what they had in front was Mr. C they would've acted differently and Mr. C would have certainly noticed it. Mr C was tricked in thinking that he was tricking the department. As soon as he realizes that he's tricked, and that they know, what happens? Mr C draws a gun. Thankfully Cooper called at the right moment and Lucy realized what was happening, all while Andy prepared Green Glove, Naido, and James (ok he's kinda useless here, I admit) to kill BOB once and for all. It is not just Lucy shooting Mr C. That's just one part of it.
I really don't know what you would expect. Them to see Mr C and realize immediately who he is and begin a chase? How? I mean, it takes quite a leap of faith to think that one person is split in two, especially one guy that the whole town loved, let alone do all they did.

I must ask, since you talk of this season while you mention that nothing happens. What does the Sheriff dept do during the original series? They don't solve a murder, they don't investigate correctly, they don’t stop drugs in school, they don’t stop a violent trucker they know about, they don't do anything other than mess and introducing Cooper to the town. The Bookhouse Boys do much more. And S3 is the only time in which the department does something without Cooper's help. In s1 and s2 they just merely follow him, like puppets. S3? They take initiative, at least to some extent.
And, procedurally speaking, even Cooper is not that good either; he needed a giant and a dream to tell him who killed Laura (in his defense, it was not easy to guess!).
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Joe McCluskey » Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:12 pm

yaxomoxay wrote:
Joe McCluskey wrote:The Sheriff's station plot didn't really serve any purpose, like many other aspects of the show. Out of curiosity, they looked into some clues that popped up--e.g., Laura Palmer's diary pages, Major Brigg's notes, etc. But all of this goes nowhere, as they don't apply any of this information in a meaningful way.

They are under some impression that there might be two Coopers, but they don't have any way of knowing that Evil Cooper is not the real deal when he arrives at the station in Part 17. Sheriff Truman never met Cooper before, so he wouldn't know if Cooper is acting odd, and Andy, someone who once knew Cooper, immediately accepts that it's the real Cooper when he approaches him. "Hawk & Bobby were somewhat ready"? They didn't do anything other than silently spectate from the sidelines. Also, Truman is completely bewildered during the phone call with Cooper, as he doesn't pull out his gun until after Evil Cooper draws his weapon, so his "understanding of the duality of Cooper" doesn't come into play here either.

Andy wasn't ready either for what was happening, despite having a lengthy scene where he receives knowledge from the Fireman. He did absolutely nothing with that information he acquired. The only reason Evil Cooper was shot was because of the phone call they received from Good Cooper, rather than the people in the Sheriff's station having knowledge of the situation at hand.

Cooper could have called the Sheriff's station anytime between waking up from coma & driving to Twin Peaks, and it would have the same effect. The only reason the phone call takes place when it does is for dramatic effect, rather than it being part of some super complex, precise plan with the Fireman.


I don't see how this view can be held in any way whatsoever, especially that what they find goes nowhere. First one of the dept. members accepts a message from a log, after a visit to a surreal place this member begins his true investigation, involving other people. Then he finds an important piece of evidence that is from a girl who died 25 years ago and somewhat it talks about a dude who's trapped. Then they visit the wife of a guy that traveled in time to find an object that tells them where to go and when, while reiterating the fact that there are two Coopers. They go and find not only an eyeless lady but also a vortex to a different dimension (if you will) where one of the team finds out the purpose of what is happening. Thanks to that not only things are prepared for Mr. C's arrival, but they work as they should. You say that Cooper could've called earlier or at any point, but you forget that Mr. C is not dumb. If the Sheriff and the other guys knew on sight that what they had in front was Mr. C they would've acted differently and Mr. C would have certainly noticed it. Mr C was tricked in thinking that he was tricking the department. As soon as he realizes that he's tricked, and that they know, what happens? Mr C draws a gun. Thankfully Cooper called at the right moment and Lucy realized what was happening, all while Andy prepared Green Glove, Naido, and James (ok he's kinda useless here, I admit) to kill BOB once and for all. It is not just Lucy shooting Mr C. That's just one part of it.
I really don't know what you would expect. Them to see Mr C and realize immediately who he is and begin a chase? How? I mean, it takes quite a leap of faith to think that one person is split in two, especially one guy that the whole town loved, let alone do all they did.

I must ask, since you talk of this season while you mention that nothing happens. What does the Sheriff dept do during the original series? They don't solve a murder, they don't investigate correctly, they don’t stop drugs in school, they don’t stop a violent trucker they know about, they don't do anything other than mess and introducing Cooper to the town. The Bookhouse Boys do much more. And S3 is the only time in which the department does something without Cooper's help. In s1 and s2 they just merely follow him, like puppets. S3? They take initiative, at least to some extent.
And, procedurally speaking, even Cooper is not that good either; he needed a giant and a dream to tell him who killed Laura (in his defense, it was not easy to guess!).

There were several scenes where it was reiterated to the Sheriff’s Dep. that there are two Coopers, yet they do nothing with that information. When Evil Cooper shows up, they don’t question if its the real Cooper that they’re welcoming to Truman’s office for a one-on-one chat? If not, what was the purpose of them discovering clues about the duality of Cooper? Again, the only reason they realize Evil Cooper was a phony was because Good Cooper called them, thus they knew that something was wrong, and even then, only Lucy had the idea to take action. Also, Good Cooper didn’t even know that Evil Cooper was at the station, so he wasn’t in on this supposed elaborate plan to call at that very moment.

They go and find not only an eyeless lady but also a vortex to a different dimension (if you will) where one of the team finds out the purpose of what is happening.

Again, Andy does nothing with his acquired knowledge. In fact, he actions contradict the knowledge he gains—e.g., welcoming Evil Cooper to the station without reservation despite knowing that there’s two Coopers, putting Freddie behind bars, etc.

Thanks to that not only things are prepared for Mr. C's arrival, but they work as they should.

They don’t prepare anything as a result of their trip. Hawk & Bobby are nowhere to be found when Evil Cooper shows up. The only thing that comes out of their trip is that they find Naido and put her behind bars. She makes weird noises for a few days. That’s all she does.
but you forget that Mr. C is not dumb

Yes, the guy who was shot twice in less than a week, was arrested, unknowingly worked with an FBI informant, surrounds himself with incompetent criminals who are either killed or arrested, and who walked into a Sheriff’s station expecting to find some great evil entity was not dumb at all.

If the Sheriff and the other guys knew on sight that what they had in front was Mr. C they would've acted differently

Suppose they did have information that Evil Cooper was arriving. They could just have their guns drawn and detain/shoot him until Cooper arrived with the ring. They wouldn’t have to worry about acting differently in front of him.
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby blue_tomorrows » Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:49 pm

I've taken a pretty long break from this forum, but I decided to catch up earlier. Once caught up, I started re-reading some of the individual part threads, and got depressed all over again. It's rather bittersweet to read all of the speculation about the various minute and tantalizing details of each part -- considering that all of the plot points, potential connections, and little mysteries were all just aimless and pointless and had no relationship whatsoever to the rest of the show.

I have decided to do a re-watch when the Blu-ray set arrives (even though the prospect of doing so doesn't exactly fill me with joy) just to be clear in my thinking and maybe find something redeeming in this godawful mess of a show (besides part 8 and some of part 3). As of now though, I'm more convinced than ever that this might be not only the worst thing that DKL ever attached his name to, but one of the worst seasons of any television show that I've ever witnessed (certainly from a dramatic perspective that's hard to argue with, since it seems to be mostly made up of unrelated fragments that are forgotten when convenient, and what happens in part 18 determines that 99% of it didn't happen anyway).

I even re-watched Inland Empire, just to see if I still liked it (I did), and if I found it incoherent in the same way I find TPTR incoherent (I didn't). I actually think the 2 works have so little in common that it's almost hard to believe they were directed by the same person! I can't quite put my finger on it, but there's a level of commitment to IE that I only felt briefly and fleetingly in TPTR. IE felt like Lynch had something he wanted to tell us, so he did (in the most interesting way he could think of). TPTR felt like he had nothing to tell us, so he didn't.

These are kind of random thoughts, but I guess my point is that my verdict on TPTR has, if anything, become much harsher since it ended, which is not usually how such things work (distance usually lends enchantment). I'm curious to see where a re-watch would take me without the distraction of seeing things for the first time. Anyone else try to re-watch and like it more? Less?
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Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby yaxomoxay » Wed Oct 11, 2017 6:31 am

Joe McCluskey - I respectfully disagree with the entirety of your post... which shall not come as a surprise :)

Let me start from here:

Hawk & Bobby are nowhere to be found when Evil Cooper shows up.


My impression is that you still see this movie as if divided in compartments, with the strings that should get all together at the end in one big fight. The reason why Hawk and Bobby do not appear is that their purpose is over.

Hawk - Initiates the investigation by believing a lady that talks to a log and finding some “procedural” evidence.
Bobby - keeps up the investigation by revealing fundamental clues
Andy - is the one that really understands the purpose and gets green glove free
Sheriff Truman - is the one that causes the “big reveal” (he also functions as an information dump device, obviously).
Lucy - she’s the one that kills Mr.C.

They worked as a team by cooperating, sharing information, going to places, and accepting a strange reality.

Joe McCluskey wrote:[
There were several scenes where it was reiterated to the Sheriff’s Dep. that there are two Coopers, yet they do nothing with that information. When Evil Cooper shows up, they don’t question if its the real Cooper that they’re welcoming to Truman’s office for a one-on-one chat? If not, what was the purpose of them discovering clues about the duality of Cooper? Again, the only reason they realize Evil Cooper was a phony was because Good Cooper called them, thus they knew that something was wrong, and even then, only Lucy had the idea to take action. Also, Good Cooper didn’t even know that Evil Cooper was at the station, so he wasn’t in on this supposed elaborate plan to call at that very moment.


The reasons is that characters don’t have the same information that we, the viewers, have. Not even Andy. They don’t know how badCooper looks, they don’t know where he’s headed, and they don’t know anything extraordinary. They knew that something was happening, and they knew that there were two Coopers (still a difficult thing to believe, wouldn’t you agree?). We have seen two Coopers for 16 hours. They didn’t. I also disagree that there was no suspicion...

Again, Andy does nothing with his acquired knowledge. In fact, he actions contradict the knowledge he gains—e.g., welcoming Evil Cooper to the station without reservation despite knowing that there’s two Coopers, putting Freddie behind bars, etc.


Andy’s behavior is strange when he sees Mr.C. He clearly invites Mr. C, but he doesn’t look 100% convinced that he is in front of Cooper. Andy isn’t the brightest cop on earth, yet a single sentence (no coffee) convinces him that he is in front of bad Cooper. To me that shows that - although uncertain - he did not fall for Mr.C’s trick. They are all suspicious about Mr. C, and the “we were just talking about you” sentence, which is said multiple times, leads me to believe that there was some sense of general knowledge.
In general, I am not sure that Andy remembered what happened in the Lodge (and here I agree with you that they should’ve made it more clear). They ALL forget what happens near a vortex; my feeling is that Andy has a subconscious memory of what he saw, but he is not actively aware of it.

You also have to compare the TP investigation with the Fuscos. Look at them. They are in an important city (as it was seen last week, sadly) with a fairly large PD. As TP Sheriff Dept they also have to deal with corruption. And as Andy they get their information dump after an investigation, which feels unrealistic to them. What happens? They throw it in the trash. While I enjoyed the meta level of the scene, it is by far in sharp contrast with Twin Peaks and its attitude.

Yes, the guy who was shot twice in less than a week, was arrested, unknowingly worked with an FBI informant, surrounds himself with incompetent criminals who are either killed or arrested, and who walked into a Sheriff’s station expecting to find some great evil entity was not dumb at all.


Again, you leave outside relevant parts of the story. Mr. C is the same guy that was on earth 25 years, tricking everyone, killing, becoming a billionaire, creating strange glass boxes in Manhattan (I wonder how he got the permit!), tricks Cooper, tricks Dougie, etc. When we see Mr. C he is at his weakest point. He threw up garmonbonzia, he can’t talk normally for a while, and the Lodge is clearly reclaiming him.

Suppose they did have information that Evil Cooper was arriving. They could just have their guns drawn and detain/shoot him until Cooper arrived with the ring. They wouldn’t have to worry about acting differently in front of him.


They had no information that Evil Cooper was arriving, and especially when. They had clues, but you’re seriously asking Andy, Bobby, Truman, Hawk, and Chad to be ready, 24/7, with weapons drawn? That’s for action movies.

I must ask again. You lament the futility of Twin Peaks Sheriff Dept. What was its purpose in S1 and S2 other than guiding Cooper around town?


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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Joe McCluskey » Wed Oct 11, 2017 8:58 am

I must ask again. You lament the futility of Twin Peaks Sheriff Dept. What was its purpose in S1 and S2 other than guiding Cooper around town?

The Sheriff's Department in seasons 1 & 2 has no bearing on our discussion of the Sheriff's Department in THE RETURN. But I do remember Harry Truman & co. doing even more of the detective work that you praise on this show, except it actually helps Cooper get a better understanding of what's happening. Also, the Sheriff's Station served as one of the vehicles for Cooper to interact with the characters of Twin Peaks.

It seems we'll have to agree to disagree on the other points.
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Joe McCluskey » Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:02 am

Audrey Horne wrote:Thank you for your videos, Joe! They're perfect.

I'm still in shock by the whole Return. The only real concrete mystery to me in the end was how Lynch and Frost constructed this ultimate mess. There was so much great potential... and this coming from someone who hates most of the second season, and thought the only way they could go was up with anything- anything! - they did.

I must have missed your reply! :o Glad you liked it!
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby yaxomoxay » Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:09 am

Joe McCluskey wrote:
I must ask again. You lament the futility of Twin Peaks Sheriff Dept. What was its purpose in S1 and S2 other than guiding Cooper around town?

The Sheriff's Department in seasons 1 & 2 has no bearing on our discussion of the Sheriff's Department in THE RETURN. But I do remember Harry Truman & co. doing even more of the detective work that you praise on this show, except it actually helps Cooper get a better understanding of what's happening. Also, the Sheriff's Station served as one of the vehicles for Cooper to interact with the characters of Twin Peaks.

It seems we'll have to agree to disagree on the other points.


Well, the importance is that in S3 they’re finally doing their job! :) Taxpayers money is finally well spent :)

As for the rest, yep we will disagree. No problem; both of us will still enjoy a good cup of coffee :)



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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Venus » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:04 pm

I've not read a lot of the posts lately. So can anyone tell me if anybody has yet got to the bottom of why evil Coop had a dog leg in the boot of his car? Anyone? I raised it (the point, not the dog leg) a little while ago and was just wondering if anyone had solved what on earth it was about in the time since.
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Venus » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:09 pm

douglasb wrote:I think it shows remarkable writing craft to think Lynch and Frost must have sat and discussed whether or not doppelgangers would have properly functioning testicles. They had to have that conversation, right? Otherwise how could BadCoop father a child? Man, the sheer depth of world building they went into.


Quote of the week :lol:
When Jupiter and Saturn meet...
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Aqwell
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Aqwell » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:30 pm

yaxomoxay wrote:My impression is that you still see this movie as if divided in compartments...


300 pages later and back to square one.
Please kill me...
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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby yaxomoxay » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:42 pm

Aqwell wrote:
yaxomoxay wrote:My impression is that you still see this movie as if divided in compartments...


300 pages later and back to square one.
Please kill me...


Wasn’t square one “you have to wait to watch the whole thing”?



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Re: Twin Peaks Return: The Profoundly Disappointed Support Group (SPOILERS)

Postby Aqwell » Wed Oct 11, 2017 2:46 pm

Venus wrote:So can anyone tell me if anybody has yet got to the bottom of why evil Coop had a dog leg in the boot of his car?
A rabbit leg was not enough badass so he went for a dog one, you know for good luck... :mrgreen:
Does it really matter? We will never really know why he wanted those coordinates either, and the show was crap, so who cares?

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