How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

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Ygdrasel
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby Ygdrasel » Thu Feb 05, 2015 3:17 pm

LostInTheMovies wrote:1. The pilot
2. The appearance of Bob in episode 1
3. The Red Room dream in episode 2
4a. The season finale - the fact that Laura's killer was not revealed
4b. The season finale - Cooper being shot
5. The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer - did you read it before watching season 2? Did it point you in a certain direction?
6a. The season 2 premiere - the very long opening with the waiter
6b. The season 2 premiere - the appearance of the giant (which certainly takes the vaguely supernatural air of the show in a new direction)
6c. The season 2 premiere - the violent flashback to Laura's murder, with Bob making his first sustained appearance
7. Bob crawling over the couch in episode 9
8a. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was Leland
8b. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was also Bob
8c. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - Maddy's murder (maybe the most disturbing thing I've seen in a TV show or even movie)
9. The way the discovery & capture of Leland/Bob is handled in episode 16
10. Leland's wake in episode 17, with the comic subplots emerging and the writers trying to move past the mystery
11. The realization that the Cooper-Audrey storyline was not going to play out
12. The stretch of episodes 17-23 (you know the ones)
13. Where you felt the show picking up again
14. The finale (and I know it was a 2-parter in '90 but I'm particularly keen to hear how the Lynch half played)
15. Fire Walk With Me


1. James snapping his pencil in two made me roll my eyes. He couldn't pull off actually emoting a little so he went for camp. The rest of the pilot was great though. I do recall getting a bit exhausted because I wasn't aware that the pilot was movie-length.

2. Scared the hell out of me and intrigued me.

3. My only visual exposure to Twin Peaks, prior to watching, was a still shot from the Red Room. When the scene came up, my attention was glued. Loved every aspect of it and loved everything involving it after.

4a. I never expected the killer to be revealed so it wasn't an issue. I got super hyped by all the cliffhangers though.

4b. This was the big "I gotta see what happens" cliffhanger for me. The payoff was ultimately disappointing though. My memory's fuzzy but wasn't it basically "Josie shot Cooper because no real reason at all"?

5. I bought the Diary and have yet to read it, actually. Same for the Access Guide.

6a. I found this very strange. Is the waiter just crazy senile? Surely he sees there's a shot man. I enjoyed the strangeness though.

6b. Loved it. The Giant was in that still shot I'd already seen so his appearance was kind of an "OH MY GOD, IT'S THAT GUY!" moment XD His last line to Coop was brilliant too.

6c. I don't recall Bob appearing but the murder did seem very brutal from the flashbacks.

7. "Oh shit oh shit oh shit!"

8a. I was spoiled on this but also found it a suitable twist as I wouldn't have expected it otherwise. It was a great reveal.

8b. I already knew that. Why were they investigating him all this time otherwise? Clear supernatural origin, it wasn't a shock that Bob was involved in the murder.

8c. Maddy's murderer was revealed as Leland before Laura's killer was revealed. Her murder was very disturbing though. It was that scene that made the "Bob's possessing him" stuff click.

9. The discovery seemed nonsensical. They just gather and suddenly the Giant decides to quit holding out info. The execution of the capture was wonderful.

10. I enjoyed the plots at the time. Mostly. There wasn't much payoff though. Still wholeheartedly love everything Dale/Briggs/Windom related.

11. Agitation and anger. Pure and simple. "Who's Annie? Audrey's hotter."

12. I don't know the ones offhand, actually. My "The show's gone downhill" moment held off until the last few episodes that decided James needed to travel and we had to be there with him.

13. It's been a while so I can't say where things 'picked up' again. Maybe when James and Donna stopped being a focus.

14. The finale was brilliance. I wasn't of significant age during the original two-parter so I can't say anything on that.

15. The very first viewing was done amid a general "This can't be as bad as Wikipedia said..." mindset and also much distraction and pausing. Due to said distraction and fragmented viewing, I was left with little coherent memory of events, general confusion at what I'd watched, but a deep intrigue and desire to see it again.
Twin Peaks has layers, man. Twin Peaks is an onion. 8)
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Fri Feb 06, 2015 2:24 pm

More great answers. Hope this thread continues forever...
rocketsan22
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby rocketsan22 » Sat Feb 07, 2015 2:31 pm

1. The pilot

I came to the party very late. It was a photo in the Toronto Sun proclaiming that the much anticipated season two premier was upon us. If it wasn't for Sherilyn Fenn's captivating eyes, I might have missed it all. I was a college football junkie and I watched very little regular television so I had not heard of Twin Peaks before that point.

It wasn't until the International pilot came out that I was able to see it. I had waited so long to see it it was euphoric to finally experience it.

I will skip the next few as they were viewed out of context...I did however make a trip to the U.S. where I saw single episode videos. I purchased the episode one vhs which UI must have watched about twenty times to get my fill...

5. The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer - did you read it before watching season 2? Did it point you in a certain direction?

I read every Twin Peaks book I could get my hands on as I caught the bug badly. Heck, I even blew off a visit to the White House during a class trip to Washington as I was so engrossed in Cooper's book...

6a. The season 2 premiere - the very long opening with the waiter

I was hooked from the moment I heard the theme song and saw the visuals of the saw blades...I was riveted by the writing and the drawn out interaction with Cooper and Senor Droolcup.

6b. The season 2 premiere - the appearance of the giant (which certainly takes the vaguely supernatural air of the show in a new direction)

I didn't know what to think but I knew it was fantastic...

6c. The season 2 premiere - the violent flashback to Laura's murder, with Bob making his first sustained appearance

I was scared sh!tless...I didn't know what to think. My mind was racing and I longed to fill in the pieces I had missed...

7. Bob crawling over the couch in episode 9

One of the most memorable moments on the show...

8a. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was Leland

I was at a dinner party which I only agreed to go to if they would let me watch Twin Peaks at 9pm...I can't say I was surprised at that point, Leland was off the rails at that point.

8b. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was also Bob

I loved this aspect...that it was likely done out of Leland's control...

8c. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - Maddy's murder (maybe the most disturbing thing I've seen in a TV show or even movie)

The dinner party people were confused as hell...I loved it...and couldn't fathom how I was going to get through the next week.

9. The way the discovery & capture of Leland/Bob is handled in episode 16

This episode made me a fan of Ray Wise. This episode...and the scene a few back when he admits to killing Jacques Renault...are riveting to watch. It was the pain Ray Wise was able to make me believe that kept me transfixed on the show throughout its run.

10. Leland's wake in episode 17, with the comic subplots emerging and the writers trying to move past the mystery

Thought the whole episode felt rushed. Still do...

11. The realization that the Cooper-Audrey storyline was not going to play out

I was glad Cooper stuck to his morals.

12. The stretch of episodes 17-23 (you know the ones)

I'm currently watching them again for the umpteenth time. Struggling to get through them. I always fast forward through the Civil War crap, it's too much to take. There must be something that drew me back in originally because...man is this stretch of episodes...bad...

13. Where you felt the show picking up again

Windom Earle for sure...

14. The finale (and I know it was a 2-parter in '90 but I'm particularly keen to hear how the Lynch half played)

Bittersweet as by this time I had a very deep connection to the show, and before this, only Star Wars had ever captivated me enough to invest emotionally in fictional characters. In writing this today, I liken my appreciation to Twin Peaks for the same reason that Lord Of The Flies or the writings of W.P. Kinsella hold true to me to this day...wonderful characters woven together with the most beautiful scenery.

15. Fire Walk With Me

By this point I would have taken ANYTHING new Twin peaks related. I must have seen the movie six or seven times in the theatre as it showed at one of the artsy theatres in Montreal where I was going to school. I'm pretty sure I snuck in a pocket tape recorder so that I could relive the story at home.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Thu Feb 12, 2015 1:59 pm

Ok, I'm finally going to answer my own question. My memory feels fresher now than it did last summer, plus this may be a good segue to finally wean myself from the internet for a few weeks to work on some other projects (but man, it was harder to ease off the Twin Peaks obsession than expected, even after finishing the videos).

I watched Twin Peaks in 2008 by renting DVDs from Netflix. I saw the whole thing in the space of about three to four weeks, so obviously my experience was rather different than someone watching it in 1990-91! Shortly after watching the whole thing, I went back and started with the pilot and wrote up an episode guide for my second viewing (which unfolded over several months). The posts can be found here: http://thedancingimage.blogspot.com/201 ... at-20.html. Disclaimer: I no longer agree with all of my conclusions!

But these were my rewatch reactions, and unfortunately I didn't keep any notes on the first run-through (Fire Walk With Me is the only part of Twin Peaks I responded to in "real-time," writing a review - which can be fond in the above link - minutes after I saw it). So I've always had to struggle to recall my initial perception which is one reason I started this thread: to re-experience that first sense of discovery vicariously.

My own experience actually began two years before I watched the full series, when I rented the Artisan set from Netflix. I can't for the life of me exactly remember what/why/how I decided to watch Twin Peaks. I don't think I'd ever seen any clips, though I must have seen an image of the Red Room at some point. I was not a TV person at all, but I was - and am - a huge movie buff and it was doubtless through some film connection that I was drawn to Twin Peaks. The big connection, of course, was Lynch. I hadn't seen that many of his films at this point, just Elephant Man when I was a little kid, Mulholland Drive (which I'd watched several times and was one of my favorite films), and Blue Velvet (which disappointed me the first time I saw it). I would watch Eraserhead within a year but I don't think I'd seen it yet. Nonetheless, on the basis of Mulholland Drive I knew Lynch was brilliant and that something about his atmosphere/style just connected with me on a gut level, like a dream. I also liked the idea of the woodsy locale and was intrigued by the hook of the sad, wistful Laura Palmer mystery; when I was a kid I had seen some TV movie (not Twin Peaks, although it would have been around the same time) in which a girl goes missing and is never seen again, and all her classmates feel a sense of loss and it always haunted me.

So, without further ado...

2. The appearance of Bob in episode 1

I'm going to discuss the pilot further down the line, because I didn't watch it until after ep. 1 & 2 (only the Artisan set was available at this time). Watching ep. 1 I wasn't sure yet if I would like Twin Peaks. It felt a bit more soap-y and "early 90s TV" than I expected (I particularly remember getting this impression from the jail cell scene with Bobby & Mike for some reason). Plus it's always odd to enter in media res. Everyone's talking about Laura Palmer (this is the episode with those weird flashbacks/video montages) and things that happened the day/night before; I'm not sure if I even realized at first this wasn't the pilot but it became clear pretty quickly.

I wondered if Lynch had just executive-produced the show or if he actually played a role in its development. There was something there, but I wasn't hooked.

Until...

Good God, when Bob's face popped up on the screen I literally leaped out of my chair and yelled so loudly that my roommate heard me from the other room. In that instant I knew I was going to like this show and that it would definitely be Lynchian because that moment reminded me so much of the creature-behind-the-dumpster in Mulholland Drive. I'd never seen anything like this on a TV show before.

3. The Red Room dream in episode 2

This scene sealed the deal - I knew this was going to be my favorite series and an unforgettable experience. But I also remember the opening of the episode, with the entire Horne clan sitting around the table munching on Brie & baguette (or about to, anyway). This was visually the most interesting thing I'd seen yet on the show, and when "Directed by David Lynch" appeared on the screen I was not surprised. This started something of a game for me when I watched the full series - I would always try to guess if Lynch was directing before the final credit came up. Usually it wasn't that difficult to determine, but I remember being surprised when his name appeared on ep. 9 (the fairly low-key opening didn't strike me as Lynchian at the time) and also when his name DIDN'T come up after the Eraserhead-esque opening shot of Todd Holland's ep. 11.

However, this game would not resume for 2 years as I stopped my initial viewing at ep. 2. Not only was the pilot unavailable at this time, season 2 hadn't yet been released on DVD so I knew I didn't want to wade further in, only to get frustrated when I had to stop prematurely. The Gold Box came out a year later but for some reason I didn't pick up with the series until '08. Oddly enough, as I realized later, looking at my Netflix account, I rented the pilot two years to the day after I had first started watching the series. Spooky... (I also watched the killer's reveal six years to the day before The Entire Mystery blu-ray was released).

1. The pilot

I liked this episode, and it filled in some gaps certainly, but I don't think I was as taken with it as I had been by ep. 2. It's definitely Lynch's most restrained, somewhat aloof episode of the series (I discuss this in the pilot thread in dugpa's "Episodes" section). Much more Blue Velvet than Mulholland Drive. Most of all, though, I really admired how Lynch & Frost's screenplay unfolded so meticulously and precisely. This may have been the beginning of my curiosity about what role Frost played in the series.

One thing I distinctly remember from my first viewing of the pilot: breaking out into a grin and sighing with relief when Cooper appeared in his car. Everything had been so grim and moody so far, which was alluring, but this felt engaging in a whole different way. I don't remember my impression of Cooper from the earlier viewings of ep. 1 & 2 but this was probably the point where I got hooked by his character.

4a. The season finale - the fact that Laura's killer was not revealed

I am pretty sure that when I started watching Twin Peaks I did not expect the killer to be revealed at all. And I was fine with that. In fact, for some reason I was initially under the impression that Twin Peaks had been cancelled because Lynch declined to solve the mystery. And that made sense to me, I felt the point of the show was that yearning to know the unknowable and that this fueled the entire mood and atmosphere of the world.

4b. The season finale - Cooper being shot

On DVD, this certainly was not as big of a deal as it would have been in the spring of 1990 but I'm sure I rushed to return the disc in order to get the next one quickly. I don't remember any real impression of Cooper's cliffhanger, but I do know that I loved Frost's direction of the episode and considered it the best non-Lynch episode of season 1. I think ep. 7 plays best on first viewing, when we are totally hooked on the various plots and want to know where it is going. At this point I believed "all roads lead to Rome" and that everything related somehow to Laura's mystery. I thought, even if the final answer is never revealed, various clues will keep tying everything in together and indicate some even larger mystery.

5. The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer - did you read it before watching season 2? Did it point you in a certain direction?

I didn't read this until last year. I can't imagine what I would have thought if I'd read it before season 2. Even if you don't draw the connection between Leland and Bob, the abuse angle is hammered home pretty strongly so I think maybe it would have made the tone/narrative of ep. 14 seem less shocking than it did.

6a. The season 2 premiere - the very long opening with the waiter

This was probably my favorite episode of the series up to this point. While I enjoyed the tone of season 1, I was generally more taken with avant-garde surrealism than tongue-in-cheek postmodernism, so I generally preferred the hypnotic style of this to the pastiche-y Invitation to Love stuff. If the Red Room was a big turning point in knowing "I'm going to love this show" the opening of season 2 was another confirmation. It felt like pure cinema to me.

6b. The season 2 premiere - the appearance of the giant (which certainly takes the vaguely supernatural air of the show in a new direction)

I think I felt the same about this as I did about the waiter. It wasn't so much the narrative detail (although I loved the idea of making the mystery more cosmic) as the style: it was like oh yes, now we're just sinking into the bath of Twin Peaks and letting the water run over us.

6c. The season 2 premiere - the violent flashback to Laura's murder, with Bob making his first sustained appearance

I have no memory of my first reaction! Even weirder, when I re-watched the episode for my episode guide a few months later (I found it a big disappointment on second viewing, though it's grown on me again) I didn't even mention this scene!! And last year, when I viewed the episode a third time it still didn't really register for me. In my mind, I conflated this sequence with the dream in the following one, where Cooper sees the blurred Bob. Only when I listened to a podcast about ep. 8, in which people raved about this scene, did I go back and realize, oh yeah, this is its own distinct sequence and actually a pretty memorable conclusion to the season opener. Now it's one of my favorite parts of Twin Peaks.

I don't know why it left such a shallow impression on me the first three times! All I can conclude is that I responded to Bob jump-scares and creepy, unexpected moments and this was more of a sustained terror which didn't have the same effect on me.

At any rate, seeing Bob kill Laura must not have surprised or shocked me in any way. I guess at this point I had already concluded he had something to do with her death.

7. Bob crawling over the couch in episode 9

This, on the other hand, my God it terrified and thrilled me! I had the same reaction as I did to Bob's first appearance in ep. 1 and it instantly became my favorite moment on the show. But I also loved the "Just You" number beforehand, which reminded me of the "Every Little Star" sequence in Mulholland Drive, with the 50s music playing and characters exchanging long, dreamy stares. I'm always taken aback by how much people seem to hate it, I guess because of James' falsetto. It felt purposefully corny to me, yet also very sincere and winsome in that perfectly Lynchian way. I felt it did a great job setting the mood for Bob's appearance.

Unfortunately, I liked the Bob sequence so much that I looked it up on YouTube...and at the end of the clip a link popped up for a video called "BOB Kills Maddy." :( My first Twin Peaks spoiler.

8a. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was Leland

Nonetheless, I still didn't know who Bob was - or if he was anybody other than himself (though ep. 13 seemed to suggest as much). I knew that it couldn't be Ben and with Maddy being murdered, I can't say Leland was a total surprise - after all, Maddy was staying with him. Plus ep. 13 & 14 really start to push Leland in a creepier, more menacing direction. But I think part of me still expected Bob to be a standalone killer and not to inhabit any host, despite Mike's scene at the end of the previous episode. I thought he might materialize and kill Maddy and than somehow Cooper would have to hunt for a killer spirit without human form, which could have been interesting in a very different way I guess.

When Bob popped up in Leland's mirror - or really, as soon as Leland started looking in the mirror, straightening his tie - it was kind of shocking. The thought of Leland being Laura's killer must have occurred to me as a possibility, but I just didn't think the show would go there. It made me feel a bit queasy and uncomfortable, especially since I'd been so excited to watch this episode (at one point or another it had become clear to me that who killed Laura Palmer was going to get an answer...and soon). I kept thinking about all Laura's statements about her romance with the "mystery man," and the fact that the killer had raped and tortured Laura, and Cooper's earlier quotes from her diary and it was just like...oh shit. They went there.

8b. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was also Bob

I think from his very first appearance I knew Bob had something to do with Laura's death. Plus knowing he was going to kill Maddy...this part of the reveal was not a surprise at all to me. I mean did it surprise anyone - other than Howard Rosenberg? ;)

8c. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - Maddy's murder (maybe the most disturbing thing I've seen in a TV show or even movie)

Interesting that I wrote that in parentheses because at the time I don't think I had the same visceral reaction to it I would later (only on last year's viewing did the full weight of the emotion really hit me). It was grisly and hard to watch, certainly, but I would say it numbed rather than jolted me. Just pretty exhausting, really. Plus I was still reeling from the Leland reveal! And, as mentioned, it had already been spoiled for me.

A word on the next scene, though: the emotions of the Road House really sunk in for me, and crystallized everything Twin Peaks had been about - this nameless sense of grief and loss that haunted everyone, and became the undercurrent to the magical melancholy mood. I also loved the Road House sequence just before the killer's reveal, with Donna lip-syncing "Rockin' Back Inside My Heart" to James. Those characters never bothered me the way they did others. They felt like they belonged to the same Lynchian world as Jeffrey & Sandy in Blue Velvet, and provided a great gateway into Laura's world (especially since, after the pilot and like one stray season 1 scene, we never actually see any of the show's teenagers in high school).

9. The way the discovery & capture of Leland/Bob is handled in episode 16

This was my first big disappointment with the show. By this point I was definitely invested in the mystery narrative as something other than just a mood-generator and I expected a much more satisfying resolution. Cooper remembering his dream felt like a deus ex machina and the episode felt like it was trying and failing to be Lynchian; it was way too bombastic. I think I may have been a bit relieved, though, to find out Bob was purely a possessive demon although Cooper's line to Truman was a bit jolting/discomforting. I couldn't yet accept the idea that incest was a part of this entertaining world.

Anyway, it did seem like Bob-on-the-loose was a great narrative angle to pursue for the rest of season 2. I fully expected the show to highlight "the darkness of the woods" and explore the cosmos of Twin Peaks in new and exciting ways. It seemed like solving Laura's mystery had just opened up even bigger mystery.

10. Leland's wake in episode 17, with the comic subplots emerging and the writers trying to move past the mystery

My heart just sank the moment the two brothers started fighting. This may be one of the moments of my first viewing I remember most distinctly because I didn't see it coming from a mile away.

11. The realization that the Cooper-Audrey storyline was not going to play out

I don't think I caught on to this the first time. I enjoyed their flirtation but I didn't know where it was going and when it ended so unceremoniously I was distracted by all the other things going wrong with the show. Only after a few rewatches did I realize what a missed opportunity this was.

12. The stretch of episodes 17-23 (you know the ones)

As soon as the killer had been revealed, I switched all of my Netflix discs to Twin Peaks so that I could just marathon the series because I was so excited and curious to see where it went next. Becoming a lame attempt at Andy Griffith with the quirkiness pumped up didn't even occur to me. But I still expected things to come together or surprise me. I thought there would be twists, that somehow there was more to Evelyn, or later JJW (I expected him to maybe be a secret villain that would kidnap/hurt Audrey or something). What a bummer to realize there wasn't.

I also did not like the Josie/drawer pull episode, which felt like the show officially jumping the shark. At least before, all the bad stuff hadn't involved the supernatural elements, allowing them to remain unsullied by the show's general decline. Throwing in the Little Man & Bob felt like such a desperate gimmick and was delivered in such an un-Lynchian way. I probably wondered if the show was just done at this point but I don't think I ever considered not watching the rest. I can't remember if I read anything about the general direction of the show while I was watching it. I think after the Maddy spoiler I tried not to Google Twin Peaks at all.

13. Where you felt the show picking up again

Around episodes 24 & 25. Certainly Cooper getting back in the suit and David Lynch coming back to town as Gordon Cole was a big turning point. I loved the Shelly/Gordon scenes. (I think at the time, the pine weasel riot & JJW overshadowed the more promising aspects of #24 but I can't recall.) The big deal was that we seemed to be heading somewhere once again. The Lodge stuff was cool, and Annie at least brought a renewed sense of suspense into this world as I wondered what Windom would do with her. I don't think I liked Windom Earle though - too goofy with his costumes and monologues. But I definitely felt like I was enjoying the show again from episode 25 or so forward. Nonetheless, I completely skipped all of these episodes - indeed, everything after Leland's death in ep. 16 - when I watched the series again and did my episode guide. So last year I saw them for the first time since my first viewing. They weren't as bad as I remembered, but they still felt just as pointless.

14. The finale (and I know it was a 2-parter in '90 but I'm particularly keen to hear how the Lynch half played)

For whatever reason, I had a strong suspicion that Lynch would return to direct the finale, and that it would be memorable, and I was not disappointed. Since I had been hooked in to Twin Peaks by the directorial style, I just loved his bold choices in this episode - opening on the close-up of Lucy/Andy, the hilarious long takes of the old man in the bank, the wide lens in the living rooms, etc. And of course, the Black Lodge! I can't remember if I was surprised to see all the familiar sights again but I do remember getting a sense that Lynch knew this was his last hurrah and ended it with a bang. Turning Cooper into Bob felt completely Lynchian to me (only recently did I learn that this wasn't his idea, and that he probably didn't like it).

Ok, my reaction to the film is so long and complicated, it's getting its own post...
Last edited by LostInTheMovies on Thu Feb 12, 2015 2:40 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Thu Feb 12, 2015 2:15 pm

15. Fire Walk With Me

Feeling that the show had declined so sharply after resolving the mystery, missing Lynch's presence behind the camera, and having been fascinated by the "aura" of Laura (ha, that rhymes) I was naturally very excited to see the movie. I had picked up some sense that it was controversial somewhere, I can't remember where or what, but had no idea how much it was hated. I knew, obviously, that it was a prequel.

I don't totally recall my reaction to the early scenes (after watching the film, I felt they were unnecessary but that was partly colored by having just sat through all the Laura stuff - I think I was probably into them as cool Lynchian setpieces while they were unfolding). Overall, the first half of the movie felt very refreshing to me, what a treat to be back under the spell of David Lynch after such a dry stretch (not including the finale). When Laura showed up, it was so cool: as much as wanting to solve the whodunit of the show, I had been drawn in by the presence of this mystery figure who meant so many different things to so many people, who was always present yet frustratingly just out of reach.

But I was also aware that the movie was walking a fine line here. Was it just going to be a perfunctory re-telling of events we already knew? Were the actors now a bit too old for their parts? Was Lynch too distant from the pilot to re-capture the mood of Twin Peaks? And while Sheryl Lee had been perfectly cast as the alluring school portrait/frozen corpse, I had no idea if she could actually carry a movie. Her performance as Maddy hadn't impressed me very much and certainly she had never had a notable career outside of Twin Peaks, suggesting that she was more a screen presence than a true actress. I don't think I terribly minded the absence of Cooper and the ensemble and the show's usual mood/style, but I wasn't sure yet if Fire Walk With Me was going to work.

During all the woozy walking-to/around-high-school scenes I had my doubt. It seemed like maybe Lynch was just indulging his own fetish/desire to explore Laura's secret world. I expected to enjoy the movie for the curio aspect if nothing else, but wasn't sure if it would really live up to the first half of the series.

I'm not sure what the turning point was. It may have been as early as Laura's goofy dialogue with James ("a turkey is one of the dumbest birds" "Gobble, gobble") which is as weirdly affecting as it is goofy - you suddenly realize that Lee is playing it straight instead of winking at us as the show would have done. It may have been her smiling at Bobby, which has the quintessentially intense Lynch slow-burn quality to it. I think by the angels speech, though, I was hooked. Wow, I thought, this movie is going to be really good and hot damn, this girl can act! I was blown away by Mike in traffic, Laura's dream (really everything with that "open door" picture which terrified me on this first viewing in ways I can't quite explain - like the most uncanny image I'd ever scene in a movie), and ESPECIALLY the Pink Room (even though this was the time of the New Line DVD with the incorrectly-mixed dialogue) which struck me as the most hypnotic and brilliant sequence I'd ever seen in a Lynch film, which put it in the running for most hypnotic and brilliant sequence ever. And most of all, every scene delivered further indication that I was witnessing an extraordinary performance by Lee. I had no clue that this was in store for me, and it was such a thrilling discovery.

You'd think with all of this that as soon as the movie ended, I would instantly declare it a masterpiece. But I didn't. The problem for me was that the film re-awakened and plunged into all the dark stuff from ep. 14 that I had managed to push aside. I watched plenty of dark and disturbing movies up to this point, so it wasn't the subject so much that bothered me as the fact that, by presenting it in the context of a half-joking, whimsical murder mystery, Twin Peaks had gotten under my skin and made the reveal feel unusually discomforting. For whatever reason, ep. 16 led me to conclude that Bob was Laura's real tormenter and that he used Leland to kill her (I think I compartmentalized the rape part, and concluded that he was abusing her as a spirit, outside of any physical body). As I wrote in my review of the time, "the sense was that Laura's troubles originated outside of her home."

Well, the "wash your hands" scene destroyed that impression in one fell swoop and left me really shaken. The realization that Laura's story was a very psychologically realistic portrait of a terrified, fucked-up kid was something I was prepared to accept, but only without all the familiar Twin Peaks baggage of inhabiting spirits, red rooms, log ladies, etc etc. It was purely a visceral reaction because I'd always been a big proponent of dream logic, surrealism, Jungian mythology etc and believed that they were a great way to deal with serious subject matter. But I just couldn't get a grip on if Lynch was truly serious with this movie, and it really bugged me. I felt a bit like Roger Ebert did in his review of Blue Velvet where he scolded Lynch for accompanying Isabella Rosellini's bruised body alongside chirpy 50s parody. In other words, I was that 1-in-1000 Twin Peaks fan who came to the film loving the surrealism, absurdist humor, and supernatural mythos of the show yet wanted to dispense with all those elements halfway through the movie. For most fans, it's not Twin Peaks-y enough. For me, at first, it was still too Twin Peaks-y.

I wrote my very ambivalent review, and the next day found I just couldn't shake the film - that it had left a deeper impression on me than any other movie I'd watched all year. I've never been someone who felt perfection trumped power. There were so many bravura setpieces, Sheryl Lee's performance was so gripping, and the emotional headspace the movie had put me in was so rare (much as I loved movies, I consumed so many that I was usually a bit distanced from them) that I could only conclude this was a truly great movie, warts and all. A true flawed masterpiece. Then I looked up the reviews and my jaw hit the floor. I knew it had been poorly-reviewed but didn't realize how much it had been hated. Moreover, it couldn't fathom what movie the critics had seen, because it certainly didn't seem to be the one I'd just watched.

I could understand if they were disturbed and frustrated by it, but they weren't - they were indifferent, mocking, bored, dismissive. They called Laura Palmer "not very interesting", had nothing to say about Sheryl Lee's performance (except for Vincent Canby's catty remark that she looked 35), wrote off Lynch as a subpar Bunuel and even, most strangely of all, classified the film as a lazy bit of fanservice. Never in my life had I seen a bigger disconnect between my own experience and the critics'. Again, I was a big film buff at this point - I had been studying classic cinema in one form or another since I was a little kid and had made several short films myself in recent years. I KNEW that the critics were wrong to heap so much disrespect on this movie, however much they personally disliked it. It was patently attempting and accomplishing way more than they realized, and it made me angry.

Anyway, I continued to discuss Fire Walk With Me on occasion with other film buffs and bloggers, and I included it on a top 100 list of favorite movies on my site (ranking it #48 which surprised me, because I still considered it very flawed - but it naturally rose to that number due to the raw memory of that first experience). I eventually bought the DVD and used a clip for a video series I did on moments from the movies in my personal collection, I included Laura on a favorite characters list (though she only made it in Pt. II, not the first round), and I watched another clip on YouTube when I was doing a list of favorite directors. But, other than those two short clips (the angel speech and the arrival at the Road House), it took me five years to sit down and watch the movie a second time. In a way, that first viewing was so strong I wanted to let it simmer and retain its impact, rather than get diluted by return visits.

16. The Special Features disc

Obviously I didn't include this on my original list but I want to end on this note, because it was very much a part of my first viewing of Twin Peaks. After I had (semi-)digested FWWM, I watched the final disc of the Gold Box and was swept back into the show's magical universe. But with a much fuller context of how popular it had been and how complicated the process of making it was. This added another dimension to my appreciation because the offscreen story was clearly as wonderful and strange as the onscreen story! I remember being particularly taken with the "season one" part of the "Secrets From Another Place" documentary, watching the construction of this whole world on an L.A. soundstage, seeing their imagination become tangible, suggestive, yet not-quite-real. (It hadn't really occurred to me just how fabricated the world of the series was: if it bothered me to notice "the sets" when I popped in the first disc in 2006, now it thrilled me.)

This more than anything was the catalyst for me to immediately start the show all over again and begin analyzing it episode-by-episode. Although there was a half-decade break between this and my past year of Twin Peaks obsession, the process really begins there.

So that's how I reacted to those turning points in Twin Peaks!
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby Rami Airola » Sat Feb 14, 2015 2:03 pm

Ygdrasel wrote:James snapping his pencil in two made me roll my eyes. He couldn't pull off actually emoting a little so he went for camp.


I thought that was ok. The feeling of people reading things from clues and reacting to them in different ways was perfect. I'm always just about to cry in that scene, until Donna sighs "Laura", which kinda ruins the whole moment. There is this special voiceless intensity in the characters, and the whole intensity completely drops instantly the moment Donna speaks. That scene didn't need Laura's name to be said. Snapping the pencil was ok for me.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby Gabriel » Thu Feb 19, 2015 6:00 pm

LostInTheMovies wrote:1. The pilot


Circa 1990 when I was about 15, I read an article about this show called Twin Peaks in a Sunday supplement, probably The Mail on Sunday or The Sunday Telegraph. It was talking about TP as the new Dallas (which put me off right away) and comparing its characters to those in Peyton Place upon which TP was said to have been based. I'd heard of Lynch being referred to negatively in reference to Dune, possibly on the BBC's hilariously trendy arts series, The Late Show, so I knew he was a bit quirky. I'd also started to read Dune around then.

My Grandfather had retired recently and moved with my Grandmother across the country to live nearer my parents. I'd been helping them set up their new house and Twin Peaks happened to be on. So I was at their house and we just happened to watch it on its first, Tuesday screening. I found it fascinating and utterly unlike Dallas. It was downright spooky yet very funny and very sad. My grandparents gave up at episode 3, but my parents and I stuck with it. My grandparents had rented a TV and VHS machine (as people did back then) so they let me have their old Betamax machine. I used all their old tapes to record the show. There was just enough room to fit George C Scott's A Christmas Carol on the end of one tape as well.

My grandparents are gone now, so there's going to be a bittersweet feeling relinking with the show after so many years. So many family members gone, friends moved on, me having moved cities twice...

2. The appearance of Bob in episode 1


Didn't exactly see him as 'BOB.' Sarah Palmer was freaky and weird anyway and this bloke Lynch was an oddball, so why wouldn't she see (what I thought was) a 'Red Indian' (different era, different ways to describe people) at the end of the sofa? I thought perhaps he was a native spirit who might be a good guy.

3. The Red Room dream in episode 2


The papers had mentioned a backwards-talking dwarf. I'd assumed it would be some crazy person showing up in the RR. The sequence was really odd and yet funny. I wasn't sure where it would lead. A
It of it was simply strange words and myth-building that wouldn't make sense until later on.

4a. The season finale - the fact that Laura's killer was not revealed


Never expected him/her to be.

4b. The season finale - Cooper being shot


Someone had been watching Dallas! To be honest, it actually was a little too Grand Guignol for me. There were enough cliffhangers without one where the main character (obviously) wouldn't die. I was more concerned about Audrey, James, Shelly, Catherine and so on.

5. The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer - did you read it before watching season 2? Did it point you in a certain direction?


Read it in the UK break between seasons over Christmas. Fell in love with Laura Palmer. Always will be a bit in love with the character. She wasn't much older than me and I had difficulties of my own in life, particularly at school. I started to see a different world existed beyond those gates. I had wondered if Harold Smith was a code name for Harry S Truman. I assumed the JH mentioned on her list of 'partners' at the orgies was Jerry Horne. Certainly, there was a hugely dark, sinister underbelly to the town, not unlike the sex cult in Eyes Wide Shut, painted by the diary that was never really exploited in the show or the movie. And obviously the diary gave real focus to BOB.

6a. The season 2 premiere - the very long opening with the waiter


Arty, interesting to look at, but frustratingly paced. It had some awesome moments, but the draggy pace might well have put off some fans. Lynch seemed to be delighting in annoying the viewer, but that's not always helpful.

6b. The season 2 premiere - the appearance of the giant (which certainly takes the vaguely supernatural air of the show in a new direction)


Having read the diary, the supernatural element wasn't unexpected. But the Giant was. Had no idea what to make of him, but he seemed like a good guy. It's interesting that he wasn't part of the Lodge Gang in FWWM. I wondered after the series ended whether he was a White Lodge spirit, hence he only showed up in the waiting room.

6c. The season 2 premiere - the violent flashback to Laura's murder, with Bob making his first sustained appearance


Great. Also, subsequently, a different view of the death scene from FWWM.

7. Bob crawling over the couch in episode 9


Terrifying. Utterly cool. I loved the show for being so funny and yet so scary. I felt like my concepts of what could be done on TV were being blown wide open. It was becoming difficult to watch much other TV in light of TP's iconoclasm.

8a. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was Leland
8b. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - the fact that it was also Bob
8c. The killer's reveal in episode 14 - Maddy's murder (maybe the most disturbing thing I've seen in a TV show or even movie)


My parents had friends over. I watched the show on my own in my bedroom on a 14-inch TV. I recorded it so my parents could see it right after. I knew the killer would be revealed. When I walked into the lounge after the episode, my Mum asked if I was all right. That I looked disappointed.

In myself perhaps . . .

I was psyched for the episode. I knew the killer would be revealed. I kept thinking: 'Cooper will figure it out.' At the Roadhouse: 'The Giant's going to help Cooper!'

The atmosphere as the record scratches on the turntable. Stifling . . . like a house with all the doors shut and the central heating turned too high for too many hours.

I wanted to know who the killer was. Why isn't Cooper figuring it out? It's Leland! Oh God! As if the sordid tales of abuse in the diary weren't terrible enough, it's her dad and he raped and killed his own child!

I wanted to know the secret, but not like that. Cooper doesn't rescue Maddy. She gets beaten to death in front of me. I hadn't seen Blue Velvet at that stage, but it was a Jeffery hiding in the wardrobe moment. I'd confronted the good guys losing in TV shows down the years, notably Blake's Seven, but not to see Cooper burst through the Palmers' front door, Truman and Hawk in tow . . .

. . . the good guys failed, the town's epic mystery was a domestic tragedy and I'd sat there as a voyeur and watched a young woman beaten to death in order to sate my appetite for an answer to a mystery.

As a teenager, all this hit me on an emotional and psychological level I'd never really experienced. I felt shaken and just . . . different. The series had a darker hue, closer to the diary at that point. The show actually grew up (or maybe I did) with that episode, but it could never quite manage the quirky joie de vivre it had before without seeming superficial. Wonderful television.

9. The way the discovery & capture of Leland/Bob is handled in episode 16


Too easy. The characters make their kinds up that they'll catch the killer, so they just catch him.

It's as if, had they had that determination in the pilot, they'd have caught him right away. Leland's capture doesn't feel earned anymore. Beautiful, emotional death scene though and the storm feels as if it's lifted.

10. Leland's wake in episode 17, with the comic subplots emerging and the writers trying to move past the mystery


Massive fail. The comedy feels false after the emotional tone of the last few episodes. Cooper needed to return to Seattle for a while. Laura's death and the revelations about Leland should have led to shockwaves across the community. The 'Eyes Wide Shut' cult from the diary should have started mopping up people who knew Laura in the event worse things in the town get exposed.

11. The realization that the Cooper-Audrey storyline was not going to play out


It just fizzled out without me really noticing. I suddenly realised the characters had hardly any scenes together. A shame. Cooper's old nemesis is after Audrey and he hardly blinks. Odd.

12. The stretch of episodes 17-23 (you know the ones)


A waste of time. At the time they seemed less bad because I couldn't see the story in overview. So I stuck with it. The hope was that it would pick up after a lull. The James/Evelyn plotline seemed like a reject from a Zalman King film of the era.

13. Where you felt the show picking up again


Towards the end, although I never really bought into the Windom Earl storyline as played out. Silly disguises, the cabin in the woods . . . he was a bit like a villain from the 1960s Batman series. The bit with the white face, red eyes and black teeth was great though, but never picked up on again. Twin Peaks had developed a reputation for doing something randomly odd/quirky/sinister, but it seemed only for the 'What the Hell?' of it, without real purpose. I still loved the show all the way through, but I loved it the way I love the second and third Indiana Jones films. I love the Laura Palmer saga the way I love Raiders of the Lost Ark.

14. The finale (and I know it was a 2-parter in '90 but I'm particularly keen to hear how the Lynch half played)


It wasn't a two parter in the UK (not that I remember!) the first half of the episode is stylistically back in season two, episode one territory: dragging out scenes to annoy the viewer. The bit in the bank was particularly irritating for me that evening. The point of the episode seemed to me to be about Cooper. The fact that I knew it was the last episode and they were throwing in loads of cliffhangers with the characters made me nervous. I suddenly thought 'Don't be predictable and trap Cooper in the lodge or have BOB take over Cooper!'

So I loved the artistic, horror aspects of the episode, loathed the cliffhangers. To this day, I've never considered it 'The End.' It was an end-of-season cliffhanger that wasn't resolved. If Lynch does a bunch of cliffhangers at the end of the new season with no sign of resolving them, I swear I'll chuck my TV out the f***ing window and never watch any TV show again!!

15. Fire Walk With Me


Saw it day one of its UK nationwide release. It's a terrific film and, for all it doesn't have a lot of the regular cast, it fits stylistically with the show up to the point where Maddy is killed. I was watching a lot of Lynch and other arthouse directors at the time thanks to Sky Movies and to UK video distributor Palace Pictures going bust, meaning a lot of VHSes were selling plentifully and cheaply. I loved the film and wanted more. The same addiction to the show I had up to the killer reveal returned. And I hoped for a long time that, in spite of a bunch of snobby French film critics and the Ciby 2000 fallout, that there would be more.

I guess the main thing with these recollections is that I was seeing it very much 'in the moment' back then, not knowing what would come next. It's funny that there was a time when I was watching TP without thinking of it as a 'complete' unit, including the books and FWWM.

Like I say, hitting middle age as I am now, having just turned 40, I'm looking back to an era when I was still at school, still had grandparents, my beloved cat would curl up with me while watching the show with my Mum and Dad. My parents are elderly now. They're still in the the same house but it looks utterly different, new furniture, new carpets, different wallpaper, new windows. My little brother is long married. I've lived nearly two lifetimes since TP finished.

What will Twin Peaks as a town be like after all this time? Who will still live there? Who will have moved on? What new buildings will there be? Has the population risen, meaning the town has expanded or has the town shrunken after the Packard sawmill burned down? Did any trashy TV show do a documentary about Laura's murder, complete with reconstruction scenes? What happened to One-Eyed Jack's?

Because the show had such an impact on me and because it's coming back, it's actually made me somewhat introspective about the whole thing. The show affected my career choice, my choice of degree at college and this very much affected where I am now. I even got to edit the UK Horror Channel's Twin Peaks trailer a few years back! Certainly, anything I've worked on of my own has influences that go back to Twin Peaks.

The return of the series will bring back a lot of memories...
Last edited by Gabriel on Thu Feb 19, 2015 7:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Thu Feb 19, 2015 6:36 pm

Gabriel, absolutely wonderful write-up. Thanks for sharing these memories, they were very evocative and resonant.

I'd say I would love to have a book full of stories of experiencing Twin Peaks, and I would, kind of, but in a way that's what this thread already is and better yet it can keep going and growing endlessly.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby Gabriel » Thu Feb 19, 2015 7:03 pm

LostInTheMovies wrote:Gabriel, absolutely wonderful write-up. Thanks for sharing these memories, they were very evocative and resonant.

I'd say I would love to have a book full of stories of experiencing Twin Peaks, and I would, kind of, but in a way that's what this thread already is and better yet it can keep going and growing endlessly.


Pleasure! Good idea for a topic. :)
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby Nightsea » Sat Mar 07, 2015 10:18 am

15. Fire Walk with Me

I've gone back and forth over whether or not I should post this. I've been a visitor to these discussion boards for a while, but didn't join until recently. But one of the main reasons as to why I joined is to be able to respond to the Fire Walk With Me aspect of this thread. There's no need for me to delve too far into this, nor would I, but I know what it's like to be abused at a young age. Essentially I knew nothing about Twin Peaks or David Lynch when this film was originally released. I was all of fourteen years old. I'd recently been through a terrible, terrible ordeal with a sexual predator. My father was absolutely horrible. So to say the least, I identified with Laura. On my first viewing of the film, I found the last twenty minutes or so incredibly difficult to endure. By the end of the film- the scene with the angel- it was as if a floodgate had been opened and I couldn't stop crying. Laura felt such relief in that final scene- to no longer be abused. I understood the relief that she felt. Over the years, I've gotten to the point where I can watch those last few scenes without falling apart emotionally.

I went on to discover Lynch's other work. I found out that he had directed The Elephant Man, which I loved. My mother purchased a box set of the original Twin Peaks series for me on VHS. Slowly I went through his work. Mulholland Drive is probably my favorite film, period, with Mysterious Skin by Gregg Araki coming in at a close second. If I could ever meet David Lynch in person, I would just want to hug him. For the longest time, I wasn't aware that the film had been received so harshly upon its original release. I just happened to see it in a local video store and the cover intrigued me. Little did I know that I would bond with it to such a degree. I'm almost crying as I type this. If readers have made it this far, thank you for your time. I may go back and address the other subjects of this thread soon, but I simply had to get my thoughts on Fire Walk With Me out there in the open and off of my chest. Thank you LostInTheMovies for the thread. And I promise to not be so emotional in future posts!
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Sat Mar 07, 2015 12:10 pm

Nightsea wrote:15. Fire Walk with Me

I've gone back and forth over whether or not I should post this. I've been a visitor to these discussion boards for a while, but didn't join until recently. But one of the main reasons as to why I joined is to be able to respond to the Fire Walk With Me aspect of this thread. There's no need for me to delve too far into this, nor would I, but I know what it's like to be abused at a young age. Essentially I knew nothing about Twin Peaks or David Lynch when this film was originally released. I was all of fourteen years old. I'd recently been through a terrible, terrible ordeal with a sexual predator. My father was absolutely horrible. So to say the least, I identified with Laura. On my first viewing of the film, I found the last twenty minutes or so incredibly difficult to endure. By the end of the film- the scene with the angel- it was as if a floodgate had been opened and I couldn't stop crying. Laura felt such relief in that final scene- to no longer be abused. I understood the relief that she felt. Over the years, I've gotten to the point where I can watch those last few scenes without falling apart emotionally.

I went on to discover Lynch's other work. I found out that he had directed The Elephant Man, which I loved. My mother purchased a box set of the original Twin Peaks series for me on VHS. Slowly I went through his work. Mulholland Drive is probably my favorite film, period, with Mysterious Skin by Gregg Araki coming in at a close second. If I could ever meet David Lynch in person, I would just want to hug him. For the longest time, I wasn't aware that the film had been received so harshly upon its original release. I just happened to see it in a local video store and the cover intrigued me. Little did I know that I would bond with it to such a degree. I'm almost crying as I type this. If readers have made it this far, thank you for your time. I may go back and address the other subjects of this thread soon, but I simply had to get my thoughts on Fire Walk With Me out there in the open and off of my chest. Thank you LostInTheMovies for the thread. And I promise to not be so emotional in future posts!


Thank you so much for sharing that, Nightsea. I hope everyone here gets a chance to read it as well because I feel it's a very important point of view on the film. And no apologes are necessary for getting emotional - it is an emotional film!

I have heard similar anecdotes from others who have been abused. And of course Lynch and Lee report receiving many thanks from survivors over the years (and I'm sure Jennifer Lynch has too, for the Diary).

To me, Twin Peaks is many things but at its core - most importantly and tying everything else together - it is about the pain of child sexual abuse.

I've often thought it would be nice if someone started a website called something like "The Laura Palmer Project" where people could share their thoughts/feelings about the character. I have noticed that many people forge a deep bond with Laura unlike any they have ever forged with another character- abuse survivors in particular, but also those who have experienced issue with drugs, disorders, or depression; family/friends of survivors (a category I and many others fit); and even those who are superficially very different but nonetheless feel her pain in a very vivid way. Many times I have heard viewers on blogs or in forums say something to the effect of, "It was a few days later and I was doing something completely unrelated and suddenly I found myself thinking about Laura and I felt sad (or even started to cry)." Wow! What a beautiful legacy for David Lynch and Sheryl Lee to leave!

Thank you again for your thoughts. Part of me wanted to just leave your comment as the most recent (and I hope I have not muddied the waters too much with a lengthy reply) but just wanted to make sure you knew your input was appreciated.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby Gabriel » Sat Mar 07, 2015 1:54 pm

I experienced appalling levels of bullying at school, some of it right off the scale, and there one or two other things that I'm not comfortable discussing that left me, to put it mildly, very f***ed up. And yes, I forged a strong bond with Laura. What she was going through was worse, but I felt like she was speaking to me and for me.

It took me years to get my sh** together and Twin Peaks gave me Laura as a character I sought solace in and Cooper as someone to aspire to be. Lynch himself remains my greatest inspiration.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Sat Mar 07, 2015 4:15 pm

Gabriel wrote:I experienced appalling levels of bullying at school, some of it right off the scale, and there one or two other things that I'm not comfortable discussing that left me, to put it mildly, very f***ed up. And yes, I forged a strong bond with Laura. What she was going through was worse, but I felt like she was speaking to me and for me.

It took me years to get my sh** together and Twin Peaks gave me Laura as a character I sought solace in and Cooper as someone to aspire to be. Lynch himself remains my greatest inspiration.


It's so amazing to think that initially Twin Peaks wasn't even really intended to be Laura's story (even to the limited extent of revealing her killer, and thus letting us know what she suffered). One of the things that fascinates me most about Twin Peaks is how that process took place, based on a combination of outside circumstances (the forced killer's reveal), the unexpected power of certain elements (especially Sheryl Lee's screen presence), and Lynch's openness and attraction to new, unexpected avenues.

That it evolved to the point where she essentially becomes co-protagonist with Cooper (even replacing him in the movie) makes Twin Peaks perpetually unique in the realm of murder mysteries. One begins as a hero and stumbles, the other begins as a fallen victim and rises to the status of hero, culminating in their mutually comforting appearance together in the Red Room at the end of FWWM. As much as I look forward to 2016, I have to admit that was a pretty powerful conclusion to the saga. I hope whatever is to come builds upon and extends the power of that image.

I think I'll start the "Laura Palmer Project" as a dugpa thread and maybe someone else can take it from there if they want to. Thanks, Nightsea & Gabriel, for getting that ball rolling.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Sat Jun 13, 2015 1:09 am

I mentioned in the OP that I might sample these responses in a compilation post at some point and I was thinking that maybe the time has come. There's such a great variety of reactions here that I think the result could look really interesting. I would probably post it on my blog in a few weeks, sort of in similar fashion to the media round-up and alt.tv.twin-peaks round-ups I did last year.

It would look something like:
1. How did you respond to the pilot?
- StealThisCorn: "..."
- LostInTheMovies: "..."
- Audrey Horne: "..."

etc. Probably everybody would be featured at least once.

But before that I wanted to give anyone else who hasn't responded yet the chance to chime in. Now's the time...

IMPORTANT: If you DO want to participate in the compilation post please write "for compilation post" or some other acknowledgement in any subsequent responses. If you DON'T, no need to say anything, my default assumption will be that you would prefer your comments just to remain in the context of this thread which is obviously perfectly fine!

If you already contributed to this thread, check your inbox - I sent PMs to everyone for their approval. Again, no need to reply if you don't want to participate, that'll be the default assumption (but if you do want to, let me know). Normally I don't worry about these things (I didn't exactly look up the alt.tv people when I compiled their old posts) but in this case, as it's a forum I actively participate in and a thread that I invited people to join in the first place I think it'd be kosher to run it by people first before putting their words in a different context.
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Re: How did you react to these turning points in Twin Peaks?

Postby Si78 » Mon Jun 15, 2015 1:57 am

That's why you never try to edit a post on your phone. I just accidentally deleted a massive post :(

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