Who eats garmonbozia?

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LostInTheMovies
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Sun Feb 08, 2015 3:39 pm

Ygdrasel wrote:People dig into Lynch's "ethos" and his Hindu fascinations and all this to figure out what he means with it all. That stuff is all interesting to be sure but what he means by it is less valuable to me than what I get out of it. I'm out to find my own cohesive interpretation so interpreting things explicitly through the Lynch lens (his ethos, his spirituality, etcetera) doesn't really occur to me.


It's about what I get out of it as well (but the two overlap - I am interested in Lynch partly because his own worldview resonates with mine, to a certain extent). I need an explanation of Mike, and the tattoo, and all the other jazz that can be emotionally/psychologically compelling; otherwise it feels too dry and cerebral, a puzzle that we can solve like a jigsaw but with no further purpose. And layering that on top of Laura's harrowing psychodrama just wouldn't work for me; it would feel out-of-place and inconsistent and turn FWWM, and to a certain extent Twin Peaks, into a hodgepodge of conflicting purposes.

The fact that I know Lynch also seeks an underlying unity and pyschological resonance only fuels my attempts to discern what that is, but the fundamental desire is my own.
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby Jasper » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:28 pm

OK,Bob wrote:
LostInTheMovies wrote:In Lynch's world, "as above, so below"

An ancient and pervasive concept, certainly. From the Upanishads, the Emerald Tablet (which Jung believed appeared to him in a dream as an emerald table, ahem)... through the New Testament ("on earth as it is in heaven")... all the way, most poetically, through to the holographic principle suggested by string theory.


Have you read bluefrank's (that's his name on this board) discourses on Lynch on his Subliminal-Synchro-Sphere blog?:
http://subliminalsynchrosphere.blogspot ... date=false

That's the first (and only) place I read an analysis that mentioned the emerald tablet/table. Building off of this, I mentioned somewhere else that the creation of Garmonbozia (transforming bad things like pain into golden psychic nourishment) struck me as being like an alchemical process, which fits nicely with the emerald tablet stuff. Of course we also have the very compelling Soma angle, which I connected to (alleged) features of TM, later discovering that I was not alone in making this observation. I think the two ideas can exist comfortably together.

Incidentally, I don't know who first mentioned it, but I agree that the Jumping Man could represent (among other things) the "as above, so below" and "intercourse between the two worlds" aspects of the lodge spirits. That mask or mask-like face and the fact that he's holding what seems like a tree totem seems to connect him to Pierre (and...trees/wood, so perhaps the trapping of souls), and the red suit could connect him to the LMFAP. It's possible that the Jumping Man is not so much a being, but a representation of action. If he is a being, perhaps he's a shamanistic character who enables interdimensional travel and so on.
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:02 pm

Jasper wrote:Have you read Fernanda's (that's his name on this board) discourses on Lynch on his Subliminal-Synchro-Sphere blog?:
http://subliminalsynchrosphere.blogspot ... date=false


Are you sure that was Fernanda? I thought that blog belonged to the commentator "bluefrank".
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby Jasper » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:09 pm

LostInTheMovies wrote:
Jasper wrote:Have you read Fernanda's (that's his name on this board) discourses on Lynch on his Subliminal-Synchro-Sphere blog?:
http://subliminalsynchrosphere.blogspot ... date=false


Are you sure that was Fernanda? I thought that blog belonged to the commentator "bluefrank".


Oh dear! I don't know why I wrote Fernanda. I guess maybe they have a somewhat similar approach. Thanks for the correction. I edited my post.
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Tue Feb 10, 2015 10:42 pm

Jasper wrote:
LostInTheMovies wrote:
Jasper wrote:Have you read Fernanda's (that's his name on this board) discourses on Lynch on his Subliminal-Synchro-Sphere blog?:
http://subliminalsynchrosphere.blogspot ... date=false


Are you sure that was Fernanda? I thought that blog belonged to the commentator "bluefrank".


Oh dear! I don't know why I wrote Fernanda. I guess maybe they have a somewhat similar approach. Thanks for the correction. I edited my post.


I hope I'm right about that! But I did do a bit of a google to discover that bluefrank was the person I discussed the Rosicrucian picket fence/red rose stuff with so at the very least he won't be offended by the attribution haha.
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby OK,Bob » Wed Feb 11, 2015 9:01 am

LostInTheMovies wrote:http://subliminalsynchrosphere.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2011-12-31T16:00:00-08:00&updated-max=2012-10-18T00:04:00%2B01:00&max-results=17&start=6&by-date=false

I don't believe I'd read that - thank you for the link. I had, however, noted the link to Egyptian mythology. In fact there are FOURTEEN trees in the Grove in Ghostwood, with a pair within the circle flanking the "gate", akin to the "sycamores of turquoise" in Egyptian lore.

It's astonishing how often, and early, the imagery of the black-oil "opening to a gateway" surrounded by twelve appears in the series. Note BLACKie's first appearance in Ep 2 (flanked by 12 working girls)... Much later at the Miss TP Pageant, the imagery is evoked in at least three ways: twelve faux trees decorate the periphery of the Roadhouse, a painting of what appears to be the Grove is used as a backdrop on stage, and when Annie BLACKburn - in a black dress - wins, she becomes surrounded by the twelve other contestant in "the winner's circle"...
"OK, Bob. OK, BOB. OK." -Audrey Horne
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Wed Feb 11, 2015 9:52 am

OK,Bob wrote:It's astonishing how often, and early, the imagery of the black-oil "opening to a gateway" surrounded by twelve appears in the series. Note BLACKie's first appearance in Ep 2 (flanked by 12 working girls)... Much later at the Miss TP Pageant, the imagery is evoked in at least three ways: twelve faux trees decorate the periphery of the Roadhouse, a painting of what appears to be the Grove is used as a backdrop on stage, and when Annie BLACKburn - in a black dress - wins, she becomes surrounded by the twelve other contestant in "the winner's circle"...


There's also the circle of candles, around a mound of dirt, in Bob's basement lair in the European version of the pilot (it also appears briefly in Cooper's dream). I noticed this link when I was doing my mythology video and I happened to dissolve from a shot of the pool in Glastonbury Grove to the Euro Bob scene. The overlapping images really looked like a visual echo. The columns in the basement even look a bit like the trees in the Grove.

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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby OK,Bob » Wed Feb 11, 2015 10:08 am

Twelve forest-green elongated triangles encircling the mounted deer head in the Bookhouse (seen the morning Truman wakes to find Jones). Twelve donuts on the plate in the conference room when Cooper is reading through the secret diary. Twelve rainbow trout, of course...
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby p-air » Thu Feb 12, 2015 12:43 pm

I’m always surprised this is never mentioned in any discussions… for me it is practically a given: surely the significance of “corn” is that it’s uniquely indigestible, as in one’s stool (this is a bit of a sordid notion… actually maybe part of why it’s never mentioned). It’s certainly seems fitting that whenever a debilitating trauma is brought about, an indigestible substance manages to accumulate. I can easily imagine David Lynch observing this unique property of corn, finding it interesting, then inquiring into it metaphysically. It seems consistent with the way he thinks.

This also seems to play into the discussion about “Samsara”:

OK,Bob wrote:The Eastern concept of Samsara seems to be at play here. Samsara is the repeating cycle of birth, life and death (reincarnation) as well as one's actions and consequences in the past, present, and future ("Is it future or is it past?" -LMFAP). Fear and ignorance keep the soul bound to the cycle of life ("and everything will proceed cyclically") and the suffering (pain and sorrow) therin
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby Jasper » Fri Feb 13, 2015 11:56 pm

I was searching around for pre-Columbian corn imagery from the Americas. I did’t find any Owl Cave Ring stuff, but I did find some neat things. Here's Quetzalcoatl delivering maize to mankind:
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Zapotec God with Ear of Maize Headdress Period III:
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Mayan Maize God:
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OK, now prepare for weirdness. I don’t want to go all Ancient Aliens on you :lol: , but on my internet travels I’ve happened upon a very interesting (and somewhat lengthy) article which I’ve only skimmed. It’s entitled Soma in the Americas: Hidden in Plain Sight. It’s about mushroom cults in the Americas (and worldwide) and some other things.

These further images of the Mayan Maize God show him making an interesting hand gesture:

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Kind of like you see in Hinduism and Buddhism:
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http://www.mushroomstone.com/somaintheamericas.htm

Most historians believe that maize or corn was domesticated in the Tehuacan Valley of Mexico, by the Olmec and Maya civilizations around 2500 BC. It was only after the voyages of Columbus in the late 15th and early 16th centuries, that explorers and traders carried maize back to Europe and introduced it to other countries.

Quoting archaeologist John L. Sorenson...

"Maize or American Indian corn was represented in pre-Columbian times in the sacred art of India at over a hundred temples, as well as in Java. At least four Sanskrit names for maize are recorded in India, and botanical evidence from corn varieties grown in remote areas of south and east Asia confirm the crop’s very early presence there. Zea mays was also known in medieval Arabia as shown by a lexical entry. (It is uncertain whether the Asian maize came from Mesoamerica or from elsewhere in the New World.)" (source, Sino-Plantonic Papers, Number 195, Dec. 2009)


Now some images from India:

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What does it all mean? Probably nothing at all, but it sure is fun!
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby OK,Bob » Sun Feb 15, 2015 7:56 am

Jasper wrote:Kind of like you see in Hinduism and Buddhism

The abhaya mudra symbolizes fearlessness, while the varada mudra symbolizes well-wishing, or the dispensing of boons (prayers).
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby Jasper » Wed Feb 18, 2015 10:53 pm

So, to answer the original question posed, I believe that ALL of the lodge inhabitants consume Garmonbozia. I'm not counting the shadow self doppelgangers as true individuals, nor am I counting spirits merely passing through on their way to perfection. I'm talking about BOB, MIKE, and any above-the-convenience-store entities who have agency and aren't merely aspects of BOB and/or MIKE (and when I say MIKE I'm including the LMFAP). I think the differences between how Garmonbozia is subtitled in the film vs. what MIKE/Gerard says about BOB's feeding habits are mostly inconsequential. I think that the lodge inhabitants all get their main nutrition and immortality from Garmonbozia, just like humans need protein and vitamins, and so on. The suggestion that BOB has additional appetites, and/or simply gets more enjoyment from the process of creating Garmonbozia is a good one. Our desires and temperaments differ as humans, and we feed our minds and spirits with different things, but we all absolutely require certain key nutrients. I think there's also the possibility that White Lodge spirits could be nourished from an opposite form of Garmonbozia, produced by human joy and well being.

In another thread I mentioned some (likely coincidental) similarities between the Hindu deity Garuda and The Jumping Man from FWWM:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2808&sid=eaaf11b19668fa492ee9d3c09ec4b9b4#p33808
At one point Garuda must acquire Amrita, an elixir of immortality. This elixir is synonymous with Soma, which we have discussed at length* as being a very likely inspiration for Garmonbozia, mainly due to the content of ancient texts, and some alleged teachings of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.

*A little bit of info I collected on the Soma/Garmonbozia similarities:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2578&start=75#p30897
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2578&start=75#p30900

In ancient Greece, the equivalent of Amrita was Ambrosia, both Northern India and Greece having been included in the expansion of the proto-Indo-Europeans. Others have mentioned that Garmonbozia and Ambrosia sound quite similar. Then again, Garmonbozia sounds a lot like Gorgonzola, so I try to keep these things in perspective. :lol:

Below I will post some select snippets (all from Wikipedia) which relate to Amrita/Ambrosia. Athough this will involve a great number of what are likely to be mere coincidences, I think there are some basic themes which are relevant to Twin Peaks (especially supernatural beings feasting on supernatural food which gives them immortality). I’ll also include some things which relate to earlier theories which propose meaningful similarities between alchemy and the lodge spirits (and Garmonbozia) in Twin Peaks, about which you can read a good deal more starting here and reading subsequent posts in the thread (especially by BlueFrank):
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2578&hilit=alchemy#p29940
And here, which is Twin Peaks analysis featured on BlueFrank’s own remarkable website:
http://subliminalsynchrosphere.blogspot ... date=false

AMRITA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amrita

Amrita is a Sanskrit word that literally means "immortality", and is often referred to in texts as nectar. The word's earliest occurrence is in the Rigveda, where it is one of several synonyms of "soma", the drink which confers immortality upon the gods. It is related etymologically to the Greek "ambrosia", and it carries the same meaning.

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HINDUISM
Amrit is repeatedly referred to as the drink of the gods, which grants them immortality.

Amrit features in the "ocean-churning" Samudra manthan legend, which describes how the devas, because of a curse from the sage Durvasa, begin to lose their immortality. Assisted by their mortal enemies, the asuras, they churn the ocean and create (among other wonderful things) amrit, the nectar of immortality.

In yogic philosophy (see yoga, Hindu philosophy) amrit is a fluid that can flow from the pituitary gland down the throat in deep states of meditation. It is considered quite a boon: some yogic texts say that one drop is enough to conquer death and achieve immortality.

Amrit is sometimes said to miraculously form on, or flow from, statues of Hindu gods. The substance so formed is consumed by worshippers and is alleged to be sweet-tasting and not at all similar to honey or sugar water.

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SIKHISM
Amrit is the name of the holy water used in the baptism ceremony (known as Amrit Sanskar or Amrit Chakhna by the Sikhs). This ceremony is observed to initiate the Sikhs into the Khalsa brotherhood. The ceremony requires the drinking of the Amrit. This water is created by mixing a number of soluble ingredients, including sugar, and is then rolled with a khanda (a double edged straight sword) with the accompaniment of scriptural recitation of five sacred Banis (chants). This Amrit is also referred to God's name as a nectar which is obtained through Guru's word, as in the following example of page 119 of Sri Guru Granth Sahib. Chanting God's name during Amrit Sanskar or Amrit Chakna uplifts a persons' physical and spiritual consciousness to a state of immortality.

BUDDHISM
Amrit also plays a significant role in Vajrayana Buddhism as a sacramental drink which is consumed at the beginning of all important rituals (…) It usually takes the form of small, dark-brown grains that are taken with water, or dissolved in very weak solutions of alcohol, and is said to improve physical and spiritual well-being.

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A Vajrayana text called Dri.Med. Zhal.Ph'reng ("the immaculate crystal garland") describes the origin of amrita in a version of the Hindu "ocean-churning" legend re-told in Buddhist terms. In this Vajrayana version, the monster Rahu steals the amrita and is blasted by Vajrapani's thunderbolt. As Rahu has already drunk the amrita he cannot die but his blood, dripping onto the surface of this earth, causes all kinds of medicinal plants to grow. At the behest of all the Buddhas, Vajrapani reassembles Rahu who eventually becomes a protector of Buddhism (according to the Tibetan "Nyingma" tradition).

Chinese Buddhism describes Amrita as blessed water, food, or other consumable objects often produced through merits of chanting mantras.


More about Amrita from the "Elixer of Life" entry:

ELIXIR OF LIFE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elixir_of_life

The elixir of life, also known as elixir of immortality and sometimes equated with the philosopher's stone, is a mythical potion that, when drunk from a certain cup at a certain time, supposedly grants the drinker eternal life and/or eternal youth. The elixir of life was also said to be able to create life. Related to the myths of Thoth and Hermes Trismegistus, both of whom in various tales are said to have drunk "the white drops" (liquid gold) and thus achieved immortality, it is mentioned in one of the Nag Hammadi texts. Alchemists in various ages and cultures sought the means of formulating the elixir.

Amrita, the elixir of life, also known to Sikhs as "Amrit, the Nectar of Immortality" (see Amrit Sanskar), has been described in the Hindu scriptures. Anybody who consumes even a tiniest portion of Amrit has been described to gain immortality. The legend has it, at early times when the inception of the world had just taken place, evil demons had gained strength. This was seen as a threat to the gods who feared them. So these gods (including Indra, the god of sky, Vayu, the god of wind, and Agni, the god of fire) went to seek advice and help from the three primary gods according to the Hindus: Vishnu (the preserver), Brahma (the creator), and Shiva (the destroyer). They suggested that Amrit could only be gained from the samudra manthan (or churning of the ocean) for the ocean in its depths hid mysterious and secret objects. Vishnu agreed to take the form of a turtle on whose shell a huge mountain was placed. This mountain was used as a churning pole.

With the help of a Vasuki (mighty and long serpent, king of Nagloka) the churning process began at the surface. From one side the gods pulled the serpent, which had coiled itself around the mountain, and the demons pulled it from the other side. As the churning process required immense strength, hence the demons were persuaded to do the job – they agreed in return for a portion of Amrit. Finally with their combined efforts (of the gods and demons), Amrit emerged from the ocean depths. All the gods were offered the drink but the gods managed to trick the demons who did not get the holy drink.

The oldest Indian writings, the Vedas (Hindu sacred scriptures), contain the same hints of alchemy that are found in evidence from ancient China, namely vague references to a connection between gold and long life. Mercury, which was so vital to alchemy everywhere, is first mentioned in the 4th to 3rd century BC Arthashastra, about the same time it is encountered in China and in the West. Evidence of the idea of transmuting base metals to gold appears in 2nd to 5th century AD Buddhist texts, about the same time as in the West.


Above we may have more possible evidence of a alchemical connection between the creation of gold/health in historical myth, and the creation of the golden psychic substance that is Garmonbozia (created from pain and suffering, as gold was hoped to be created from base metals).

AMBROSIA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambrosia
In ancient Greek mythology, ambrosia is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it. It was brought to the gods in Olympus by doves, so it may have been thought of in the Homeric tradition as a kind of divine exhalation of the Earth.
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Ambrosia is sometimes depicted in ancient art as distributed by a nymph labeled with that name. In the myth of Lycurgus, an opponent to the wine god Dionysus, violence committed against Ambrosia turns her into a grapevine.
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The consumption of ambrosia was typically reserved for divine beings. Upon his assumption into immortality on Olympus, Heracles is given ambrosia by Athena, while the hero Tydeus is denied the same thing when the goddess discovers him eating human brains. In one version of the myth of Tantalus, part of Tantalus' crime is that after tasting ambrosia himself, he attempts to steal some away to give to other mortals. Those who consume ambrosia typically had not blood in their veins, but ichor.
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• In the story of Cupid and Psyche as told by Apuleius, Psyche is given ambrosia upon her completion of the quests set by Venus and her acceptance on Olympus. After she partakes, she and Cupid are wed as gods.
• Some ancient Egyptian statues of Anubis read,"...I am death...I eat ambrosia and drink blood..." which hints that ambrosia is a food of some sort.


Regarding that last bit, if it’s not intentional, it’s still a beautiful coincidence.

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AMERETAT (Zoroasterism)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ameretat

Ameretat is the Avestan language name of the Zoroastrian divinity/divine concept of immortality. Ameretat is the Amesha Spenta of long life on earth and perpetuality in the hereafter.

The word ameretat is grammatically feminine and the divinity Ameretat is a female entity. Etymologically, Avestan ameretat derives from an Indo-Iranian root and is linguistically related to Vedic Sanskrit amrtatva.
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In the Bundahishn, a Zoroastrian account of creation completed in the 12th century, Ameretat and Haurvatat appear—together with Spenta Armaiti (MP: Spendarmad), the third female Amesha Spenta—on the left hand of Ahura Mazda (Bundahishn 26.8.). Throughout Zoroastrian scripture and tradition, these three principles are most consistently identified with the creations that they represent: respectively plant life, water, and earth.

According to the cosmological legends of the Bundahishn, when Angra Mainyu (MP: Ahriman) withered the primordial plant, Ameretat crushed it to pulp and mixed it with water. Tishtrya then took the water and spread it over the world as rain, which in turn caused a multitude of other plants to grow up.

In the calendrical dedication of Siroza 1.7, Ameretat is invoked on the seventh day of each month together with the Gaokarena (the "White Haoma"). This Younger Avestan allusion to immortality is properly developed in Bundahishn 27.2, where White Haoma is considered to be the "death-dispelling chief of plants." From this White Hom, the ambrosia of immortality will be prepared at the final renovation of the world (Bd. 19.13; 30.25). Other chapters have the nectar being created from Ameretat herself (e.g. Bd. 26.113).


THE PHILOSOPHER’S STONE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosopher%27s_stone

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Within Hinduism it is connected with the gods Vishnu and Ganesha. In Hindu tradition it is often depicted as a fabulous jewel in the possession of the Naga king or as on the forehead of the Makara. The Yoga Vasistha, originally written in the 10th century AD, contains a story about the philosophers' stone.

A great Hindu sage wrote about the spiritual accomplishment of Gnosis using the metaphor of the philosophers' stone. Saint Jnaneshwar (1275–1296), wrote a commentary with 17 references to the philosophers' stone that explicitly transmutes base metal into gold. The seventh century Indian sage Thirumoolar in his classic Tirumandhiram explains man's path to immortal divinity. In verse 2709 he declares that the name of God, Shiva or the god Shambala, is an alchemical vehicle that turns the body into immortal gold.

It could also be the Syamantaka mani.

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PROPERTIES
The philosophers' stone has been attributed with many mystical and magical properties. The most commonly mentioned properties are the ability to transmute base metals into gold or silver, and the ability to heal all forms of illness and prolong the life of any person who consumes a small part of the philosophers' stone. Other mentioned properties include: creation of perpetually burning lamps, transmutation of common crystals into precious stones and diamonds, reviving of dead plants, creation of flexible or malleable glass, or the creation of a clone or homunculus.

HOMUNCULUS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homunculus

A homunculus (Latin for "little man", plural: "homunculi"; from the masculine diminutive form of homo, "man") is a representation of a small human being. Popularized in sixteenth century alchemy and nineteenth century fiction, it has historically referred to the creation of a miniature, fully formed human. The concept has roots in preformationism as well as earlier folklore and alchemic traditions.

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ALCHEMY
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Although the actual word "homunculus" was never used, Carl Jung believed that the concept first appeared in the Visions of Zosimos, written in the third century AD. In the visions, Zosimos encounters a priest who changes into "the opposite of himself, into a mutilated anthroparion". The Greek word "anthroparion" is similar to "homunculus" – a diminutive form of "man". Zosimos subsequently encounters other anthroparion in his dream but there is no mention of the creation of artificial life.



MOHINI
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohini

Mohini is the only female avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu. She is portrayed as a femme fatale, an enchantress, who maddens lovers, sometimes leading them to their doom. Mohini is introduced into the Hindu mythology in the narrative epic of the Mahabharata. Here, she appears as a form of Vishnu, acquires the pot of Amrita (an elixir of immortality) from thieving asuras (demons), and gives it back to the devas (gods), helping them retain their immortality.

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RELATIONSHIP WITH SHIVA:

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Mohini plays a lesser role in a Shaiva legend in the Skanda Purana. Here, Vishnu as Mohini joins Shiva to teach a lesson to arrogant sages. A group of sages are performing rituals in a forest, and start to consider themselves as gods. To humble them, Shiva takes the form of an attractive young beggar (Bhikshatana) and Vishnu becomes Mohini, his wife. While the sages fall for Mohini, their women wildly chase Shiva. When they regain their senses, they perform a black magic sacrifice, which produces a serpent, a lion, an elephant (or tiger) and a dwarf, all of which are overpowered by Shiva. Shiva then dances on the dwarf and takes the form of Nataraja, the cosmic dancer. The legend is retold in the Tamil Kovil Puranam and Kandha Puranam with some variation. This legend is also told in the Sthala Purana related to the Chidambaram Temple dedicated to Shiva-Nataraja.

Mohini, the female form of Vishnu holding the pot of Amrit which she distributes amongst all gods leaving aside demons. Location: Darasuram, Tamil Nadu, India
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Mohini distributing the Amrita to the Devas (left), while the Asuras look on
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I couldn’t resist including the portion which mentions “dances” so close to “dwarf”, though it’s clearly irrelevant(?) to Twin Peaks.

Recall that Amrita is connected to Ambrosia. In Greek mythology, Hebe is the goddess who takes on the role of the server of Ambrosia (and nectar) to the gods.

HEBE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebe_%28mythology%29

In Greek mythology, Hebe is the goddess of youth (Roman equivalent: Juventus). She is the daughter of Zeus and Hera. Hebe was the cupbearer for the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, serving their nectar and ambrosia, until she was married to Heracles (Roman equivalent: Hercules).

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We’ve had two Venus statues in the lodge. Hebe might make a fitting addition.
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:44 am

Woah, I haven't even looked at these latest additions yet but just wanted to say I lived the early stuff with the Jumping Man. Definitely resonated for me (or was that the Vedas thread? I'm getting lost now!).
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby StealThisCorn » Mon Feb 23, 2015 5:07 pm

From what I see, I would find it far too misleading for Lynch to create a shot of Bob and the Little Man seated at the Formica table with bowls of garmonbozia before them and then expect us *not* to assume that is what Bob eats. At the end of the series, if you hadn't seen the film yet, it was still somewhat of a mystery why Bob inhabited people to engage in rape-murders besides for the evulz. That said, I can also see the discrepancy between Bob feeding on "fear and the pleasures" as recounted by Mike in Episode 13 and "Bob I want all my garmonbozia (pain and suffering)" said by Mike in the film.

So I think that an idea LostInTheMovies posted somewhere in one of these threads may be on to something that perhaps garmonbozia encompasses the totality of mortal emotion and takes on the characteristics of whatever psychic stimuli it is responding to, whether fear and pleasure or pain and suffering. We are the corn.
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Re: Who eats garmonbozia?

Postby LostInTheMovies » Wed Feb 25, 2015 2:33 am

StealThisCorn wrote:So I think that an idea LostInTheMovies posted somewhere in one of these threads may be on to something that perhaps garmonbozia encompasses the totality of mortal emotion and takes on the characteristics of whatever psychic stimuli it is responding to, whether fear and pleasure or pain and suffering. We are the corn.


It would be a good way for Lynch to have his cake (corn?) and eat it too. It's always seemed a but surprising that he chose to actually define garmonbozia and I suspect it was a very last-minute decision on his part (in the script the subtitle reads "corn" - thanks for the tip, Dave !). Like maybe he figured, the mythology of this film is already obscure enough, haha...

It's also interesting because from FWWM - actually, probably the finale - on I get the sense that for Lynch there is an underlying meaning or unity to all the strange, disparate stuff we see in his films whereas earlier (including much of the show) I think it may just be straight-up, hey this looks cool throw it in. Certainly Wild at Heart seems to operate on that level...

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