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PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:02 pm 
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Since I love talking about Twin Peaks. I need a thread to celebrate and have my fix about the ultimate reason why I stuck with the show and it remains my favorite thing of all time -well, the first half anyway -little Audrey Horne.

With the release of the CD, I got quite a chuckle that yet again, the Audrey character gets two tracks dedicated to her -Audrey's Prayer and Audrey. -after the first soundtrack had Audrey's Dance and Freshly Squeezed

Rewatching the Audrey Prayer scene from the second season, I found myself glued to my seat, and how wonderful Lynch directs the whole final segment - Cooper's sizing up the day's event and then a cut to Audrey praying from her bed for his help, and then cutting back to Cooper. It's a beautiful and wonderful moment, that is then concluded with the supernatural elements of the Giant, BOB and then the death of Laura. There's everything that I love about the series right there. There's a wonderful fairy tale element to this world that is equally horrific as it is idealized -like all fairy tales should be.

I just need a thread to keep adding all my thoughts about the character and celebrating her -I found her to be the equal of the Cooper and Laura character.

My first favorite moment of the character -in what I think is a moment of directorial and actor genius -Audrey Horne nonchalantlu spies on Batis and Jenny through the slots in a closet while smoking a cigarette. The moment if analyzed is ridiculous. But when executed it shows us that Audrey can move through time and space virtually undetected -she can get out of any situation, especially amongst people who are not her equals (Batis and Jenny are mere comic relief/triffles in her world) -this adds to the payoff when Audrey finally finds herself over her head.

Feel free to the Audrey love -I know I will.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 8:08 am 
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Audrey is soooo lovely! :P

I've been in love with her since she said something like "Sometimes I get so flushed, it's interesting. Do your palms ever itch?" in the first epsiodes :lol:

It's a shame that Audrey got worse as a character in the latter epsiodes, when Cooper told her he didn't want her.
She was such a powerful character, but completely lost her way once Laura's killer got revealed.

IMHO, other interesting characters such as Ben Horne or Josie Packard also behaved "weirdly" in the latter episodes. :?:


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 7:56 pm 
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Back to All Things Audrey.

What I think was one of Audrey's strengths as a character is what Sherilyn Fenn herself describes as allowing the "character to blossom."

There's a wonderful slow burn with the character that creeps up on you. Naturally this is the case with all the characters, and the true strength of the first season. But there's something dangerous, exciting, and tragic about Audrey's voyage.

What worked best about her was she was a person on the brink of adulthood and excited and confused about her own yearning -"impatient" is the word that lands on her face during the funeral scene ..."impatient for her life to begin and to catch with her dreams." A truly fantastic scene to begin with but this voiceover of the priest cuts from Middy (more or less, Laura Palmer's ghost) to Audrey (impatient) and then to Cooper. Audrey's impatience subsides to a smile and then followed by a smile from Cooper himself. It's a sly, subtle, but at the same time exhilarating moment that I've always loved.

There's a great sense of Audrey not being entirely comfortable in her own skin that again lends itself to the duality in Twin Peaks. She has put on the skin of a femme fatale, but it masks a yearning heart -that has been hinted at and has been fun to watch but comes all together in the sixth episode when Audrey cries watching Leland dance and the community unknowingly mock his grief. To me, this scene represents Twin Peaks greatest attribute -scratch the surface and no one is what they seem, and everyone has a flip side.

The boldness of Audrey is always fun to watch -and contribute some of the best scenes of the first season. But again, the boldness hides a mask of uncertainty -a role she is playing. Note how she is unable to make eye contact with Donna before she lulls herself into the dream of the music. While playing her part and tauntingly telling Cooper she's "in a hurry", Audrey can't come with an answer when pressed by him, "Where are you going?" She merely shrugs. He has broken her script, the fantasy, and continues to throw her in her own act of sophisticated make-believe.

The most interesting thing about the Audrey character -and it is due to Fenn's early choices- are she is always a bit off; she doesn't fit in with the other school residents, again the impatience. She gets sucked up into a fantasy world, "escape." -Most tellingly when she fixates on the excitement of something outside the box, she utters:

"When I think about it, when I think of Laura being in a place like that, I get all shivery inside. But it's like a hot-cold, you know, like when you hold an ice cube to your skin for a long time..."

Again, Donna breaks her reverie and snaps her back into the world at hand. Audrey is consumed with something beyond her knowledge, and is unable to stop even herself from venturing into this dark world. Note the quick grin and shiver she presents to Donna before exiting the bathroom. She's impulsive beyond her control.

Sadly, the strength of the Audrey character is lost towards the middle of the second season. I think it holds up through a good portion of it, but I would say she disappears as soon as she leaves Denise and Cooper. The next episode, the character fully dissipates into a semi His Girl Friday mode that has betrayed the entire psyche of the character up until that point. And while it's still fun to watch Fenn, there is now lightness to the character that has never been prevalent to her before.
And while it might be justified in a superficial narrative way -oh, she's grown up, she's helping her father -it's done in such a way that has deflated the fragility and strength of the original course of the character.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 8:41 pm 
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Not that anyone's reading, but I think I'll take a post over each day and dissect the character through the episodes.

Audrey 'first episode, the pilot.

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Audrey is the first of the Twin Peaks trinity girls to appear on the show. The reveal is strong 'fun, and bouncy, coupled by Badalamenti's jazzy score. A simple, yet succinct scene directed by Lynch. The Great Northern sign is revealed, and a shot of the rarely seen Grange (the Horne's residence) is shown. A car waits, and a teenaged girl saunters from the interior into the car, door held open for her. What is interesting, and the first thoroughly evident shot of establishing a world that does not possibly exist in the current time is the character's wardrobe. What is now known as her signature look, this is the first reveal of the plaid skirt and sweater, and with an isolated and framed shot that Lynch and Fenn hold for a moment, the iconic saddle shoes. We have an immediate throwback to yesteryear, a Norman Rockwell moment that has been more than slightly fetishized.

Okay, thanks for the visual Lynch 'combined so far with an Asian woman scrutinizing herself in a mirror while serenely humming, and an equally serene blue girl corpse revealed like a bouquet of flowers in close-up 'we know have three strong visuals, and know we're on the road to something exciting, and little bit off from anything we've seen before.

We next spot the Audrey character in the high school 'and now she is established as a satellite character for our possible heroine, Donna Hayward. Lynch, continuing the aspect of fun for this shoe motif, revisits the saddle shoes. Audrey removes the symbol of "good girl"and puts on the exciting "bad girl"red pumps. Completeling the package, the character sneaks a puff on a cigarette and shares a smile with the good girl, Donna. Her makeup is slightly stylized, the hair cropped, and the eye brows arched beyond the norm. The image of this character recalls the type of a Natalie Wood in Nicolas Ray's "Rebel Without a Cause." Audrey now exists as a cinematic image. She is set up as an equal set piece of Lynch's love of film, and a hint that we will be experiencing blurred genres, and twisting familiar cinematic images.

The classroom scene, a fantastic example of establishing the characters' identities while also building a sense of suspense, mystery, and sadness, uses the Audrey character once again as a set piece 'the shoes once again, and a counter point to Donna's grief. The knowledge of Laura's death brings tears and compassion from most in the room. But the isolated shot of Audrey shows a person with no emotion and leaves the viewer pondering if the girl is in quiet contemplation or smug satisfaction. Clearly, in terms of the murder mystery aspect of the show, the shot puts this girl on the list of suspects.

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The next portion of the pilot has the famous Norwegian scene. The entire scene continues the use of the Audrey character as a removed character 'one we don't emphasize with like Donna Hayward, but instead observe. It is used as comic relief, and it establishes that this girl has a rather selfish, yet playful nature (the pencil in the Styrofoam cup) 'and then possibly a rather calculating, scheming mind. She has a full on knowledge of how her body and body language can literally command a room, and then how her words carefully chosen can clear a room. The payoff naturally is Benjamin Horne's frustration and verbal fight with the translator of the Norwegian's while Audrey with uncontrollable glee watches on from the safety of one of her clandestine hiding places. What is the purpose? Does this girl get a charge (sexual?) out of her shenanigans? Is there a reason she exploits the death of a local girl? Is there a mental instability? Whatever the case, the scene is enjoyable, but again, we observe the girl, not empathize or even remotely relate to her. She is a cinematic femme fatale jr. in training. A set piece.

Her final scene, however, begins to give her a hook that is beyond the stylized. While the Audrey character says nothing, the scene with her mother while the two listen to Johnny's constant rocks from the room above grounds her into a sad reality. Now she has a tie to Laura, and a possible explanation for her behavior.

The character fits right in with the other quirky personas we've met 'the woman with an eye patch, the woman carrying a log, and so forth. We've accepted this is the town vixen, and when she returns will probably be bringing trouble and comic relief. But did the strange girl kill Laura Palmer? We enjoy the character, but certainly don't identify with her after the pilot finishes.

Watching the pilot again, after getting further into the series, it's hard not to see the fun and excitement about one of the show's eventual favorite characters. But the initial reaction is more clinical and not endearing 'the journey will slowly build starting with the next episode.

What is interesting is the timeframe of the pilot with the development with the rest of the first season and possibly beyond. On the page, there's not much there, and I wonder what the original intent with the Audrey character was. Was it after the filming of the pilot and the piecing together of the final pilot product was the path for the character rethought? Was there originally the idea that pairing her with Agent Cooper would be a good idea? After all, it could be awkward before any of it was actually filmed, and the chemistry between Fenn and MacLachlan unknown. Possibly, just the subplot of a teenage girl with a crush and delving into the dark world was enough on paper, whether the viewer wanted her to wind up with the inappropriately older recipient or not. It would be fascinating to know how the series grew from the pilot especially with the direction they took this character.

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God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?


Last edited by Audrey Horne on Sun Oct 21, 2007 12:39 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 10:02 pm 
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Audrey- episode two

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Along with many of the characters, Audrey takes on more shape as a fleshed out character most likely due to the hiatus from the filming of the pilot and the network pickup and order for seven more episodes. A narrative can be put into place and in episodic fashion begin to plant its seed for a full-on story arc, while at the same time fully incorporating the directorial style and pace Lynch gives birth to in the prior episode.

Also, like many of the main characters, Audrey will be featured in two scenes. This seems to be the formula for most, with the obvious exception being Cooper and Truman.
This outing will involve Audrey with her first meeting with Agent Cooper, and then with her father; the two most integral players to the Audrey storyline.

The episode begins in a terrific mode, as we observe Cooper beginning his day, all his quirks in full gear. He hangs upside down, and dictates to Diane, and while still on the Palmer case is preoccupied with the Kennedy/Monroe triangle and "who pulled the trigger on JFK?" Badalamenti's score is light and jazzy, and more importantly, fun. We like Cooper, and have already identified with him as our hero. He's charismatic, smart, and inquisitive. We're clearly on his side and rooting for him to solve the case. We move onto breakfast where Cooper continues and further these wonderful quirks, and utters his famous tagline that he is drinking, a "damn fine cup of coffee."

Audrey is revealed in a one-shot. She, like us, has observed Cooper, and the tone he has set on the viewer translates to her as well. The audience likes Cooper, therefore so will Audrey. Interestingly, the appearance of this girl in the single shot takes a second to for the viewer to register. After all, in the case of most pilots and the next aired episode, filming time has been longer than usual and the appearance of the actor slightly changes. Where the character in the pilot was visually harsher, the hair is now longer, the character softened a bit. Despite the change, we quickly recall that this is the bad girl/femme fatale and she spells trouble, and most likely in a comical way.

On cue, Cooper notices her and with the aid of the music (aptly names Freshly Squeezed), Audrey segues towards him. A new target/plaything for her, like the Norwegians previously, perhaps? We've just had the image of Marilyn Monroe put into our heads by Cooper, and now it's hard not to associate it with this woman. The viewer now knows Cooper will have his first challenge of the day based on the knowledge of how this character behaved in the prior episode.

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The meeting however, is exciting to the viewer. There is an immediate chemistry between the two characters, and it is displayed in a form of introductions and social niceties. The viewer once again, still views Audrey as a set-piece, they do not identify with her. But what transpires in the scene is that, in a similar manner to how Cooper is able to diffuse Bobby, James and Donna previously, he is able to diffuse Audrey. Her tricks she has used on the Norwegians don't seem to work. She can't take a direct approach with him, and seems to speak in fragments. While possibly enchanted with her, his gaze stays firmly on her, while hers constantly darts away, and meets his dartingly. Perhaps this is just another tactic she uses, but more or less, Cooper doesn't let her get away with anything. We learn more exposition from her 'Laura wasn't a friend but tutored her brother, and the brother is mentally slow for his age ("Johnny's twenty-seven and in the third grade"). The scene ends with her impetuously asking Cooper if he likes her ring and more evocatively, if his "palms ever itch?" Cooper for once, finally looks flustered, and possibly Audrey has scored a point. The scene established a new dynamic that we expect to reoccur 'the comic femme fatale inadvertently giving our hero a reoccurring challenge and more comic relief. Visually the pairing is quite attractive 'both with similar extreme physical attributes 'porcelain skin and jet black hair, and both dressed in black 'they could be a set of bookends. We know they'll meet again, and it will probably be fun for the viewer.

The next Audrey scene is another classic. This time it is a scene between her and her father. We begin with the establishing shot of the saddle shoes, and we know immediately who the character is. We hear the strains of more Badalementi, as the camera pans up and we see the femme fatale character slowly swaying back and forth in her own reverie. Most likely, we anticipate another light-hearted scene. And it follows in that form, as Benjamin dramatically enters and abruptly shuts down the music. Interestingly and probably greeted by chuckles from the audience, Audrey continues to sway to music no longer in the air. The scene, expertly played by both Fenn and Beymer, now shows the dynamic between father and daughter, and that neither will ever give another an inch. Up until now, Benjamin Horne has been shown only as the one in control, but now we see first hand that his teenaged daughter can go head to head with him, and his threats are empty '"Oh daddy, I'm so afraid"she rebuffs. The scene, completed entirely in one shot, takes a turn from the comic to the possible tragic, when Ben scornfully tells Audrey, "Laura died two days ago. I lost you years ago." The scene ends on a tight close-up on Fenn's face in quiet contemplation with Badalamenti's music returning but now as a score, and possibly in Audrey's mind.

The scene is successful in transferring what was initially a character used for comic relief to now a full-bodied person we want to know more about. Her previous antics may have been caused by pain, and we now want to learn more. She now comes across as a hurt, lonely girl and possibly trapped in this isolated castle posing as a hotel. The brat now has motivation for her actions, and we want to find out what they are. And also, did she murder Laura Palmer?

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God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?


Last edited by Audrey Horne on Sun Oct 28, 2007 11:56 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 12:19 am 
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Great thread Audrey! Keep it up!

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:27 pm 
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Audrey 'episode three

Episode three is perhaps the most famous episode of the entire season. Directed by Lynch, it incorporates all of Twin Peaks most important staples 'mode, tone, color, music and style are all in its best form. The dominant traits of each character shine in their segment, practically becoming their signature scene; Ben Horne is at his lecherous best, Cooper's unorthodox detective skills and the glee in which he performs each and every task, Donna and James' teenage innocence, Pete and Catherine's sparring, etc. No exception to this is Audrey's character. Notwithstanding her famous cherry stem moment, episode three provides the Audrey character with her most indelible image; the moody solo dance in the Double R Diner.

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Audrey is featured in two scenes, again keeping with the normal episode structure for the main cast. The first scene, she is not the focus, but instead used along with her mother and Johnny, as a three-person audience for her father, and eventually, her uncle Jerry. Lynch begins the episode with a four person shot depicting the Horne family in mundane dinner activity. Keeping the projection of a cold family, no one utters a word, and it is sensed that this is purely ritual. Jerry breaks the rhythm by barging into the room, luggage and troops in tow. The scene is strictly Benjamin and Jerry's. Jerry's advancement towards Audrey does have a slight perverse tone to it, "Hey, Audrey! Uncle Jerry's back." The man is slick, and possibly seedy. It doesn't help that the brie sandwiches that he shares with his brother rekindles memories of young girls the brothers have been with. (A brilliant use of the suggestion of oral sex getting past the ABC censors). All in all, the scene for Audrey is only helpful in furthering the fact that the family is essentially broken, and communication is completely fractured.

The next scene involving the Audrey character, actually doesn't feature Fenn at all, but is equally pivotal to both the plot and continuing the building of her character. It will also add to her next scene in the diner. The moment is Cooper alone in his room and discovers the One-Eyed Jack note. Cooper is in his safe haven, and can end his day. A knock at the door, and note slipped under it leads him back into action. It's a quiet moment. He opens the door, and the culprit is gone. He opens the letter, reads its content and smiles to himself in satisfaction. While the scene could potentially be shot as a mystery, the way it is presented, there is no doubt who is behind the deed. We know by the cue of the jazzy Badalamenti score, and the return of the smile Cooper flashed at breakfast, that Audrey has provided the information. The scene is pivotal in the fact that in its simplicity we learn that Audrey is helping Cooper, that she is furtive, and that Cooper has taking a liking to her methods and is not alarmed. She has played a coy game of the chase, and he thinks there is a charm to it.

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Now the scene that made Audrey Horne an instant icon and the Twin Peaks poster girl of seductive quirkiness follows next. It is arguably one of the most famous scenes of Twin Peaks, already in an episode of many famous scenes. The Double R scene upon first viewing is slow and hypnotic. It hosts a world of Norman Rockwell ideals; a cup of coffee, waitresses, polite conversation, and family eating together after church. Audrey's entrance into this world is interesting in the fact that she doesn't quite fit. Fenn's psychical appearance is striking, a face of extremes 'her skin creamy white juxtaposed against her black hair, the eyebrows sculpted into an arch of heightened absurdity with a beauty mark nestled below one. The image evokes the controlled appearance of the 30s and 40s movie stars. The character is in essence rooted in a visual, cinematic fantasy. What is interesting about the person here is her shyness. She finds herself lost in a cup of coffee, scrutinizing and practically paying homage to it. We learn that it represents Cooper and with that the idea of escape. The conventional heroine Donna Hayward joins her, and we learn how Audrey interacts with her peers. Audrey is an introvert, she has trouble meeting Donna's gaze. We assume from this interaction, that this is the way she is with the other teenagers. She is not able to fit into their world. No sock hops and football games for this girl. Fenn has a tremendous grasp on Audrey, and allows her to just give into the moment, quiet contemplation and letting ideas come into her head. Clearly, along with Fenn and Lynch's help, Audrey has a wisdom and intelligence that she can't quite articulate. We also observe and continue to find a sadness to this girl. She has a need to go to church "because of Laura." She feels the need to pay respect for what Laura has done for her brother. And we continue to understand the plot aspect that she is in fact going to pursue Cooper, but now there is a sense of determination that it is with a reason 'to figure out the mystery of what happened to Laura. And the connection/jealousy concerning her father. Her senses peaked, she has nowhere to go except give over to the mood and the music '"God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?" It isn't premeditated, but a force beyond her control to lift herself and sway to the music. It is only here that she finds her bearings. She glides her hands through space, and seems to be empowered by the notes. Now she can fully make eye contact with Donna, and is in full control. It is practically a seduction towards the Donna character, an attempt to pull her into Audrey's world. It finally indicates that Audrey's actions are not sexually, but based in a power she cannot control.

The final impression from this episode of Audrey is quite strong, and now that she has a plot tie to Cooper, we take note that she will most likely be coming to the forefront of the series. The series has continues to throw us curve balls with her, and in this case has gone to its most extreme lengths with its severity. Audrey now has provided us with a depth and a dramatic hook to the future action 'will she be an aid or a foil to Cooper, and does she mirror Laura, or did she kill her?

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*With reflection of watching this episode after seeing the dream sequence and the introduction of The Little Man From Another Place, and revisiting the episode further into the series, we must note that Audrey dances out of a compulsion. She doesn't fit in the world around her, and has the potential to also access this dream world much like Cooper.

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God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?


Last edited by Audrey Horne on Wed Oct 31, 2007 8:04 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 9:36 pm 
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I haven't gotten lazy, just a busy weekend. And to be a good sport, I guess I'll FORCE myself to rewatch the next two episodes to make sure I really know what I'm talking about. It's a tough job, but someone has to do it. The first season is so breath-takingly good, I might get too caught up in it.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:01 pm 
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Audrey 'episode four

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Ah, the funeral episode. Not to sound like a broken record, but another perfectly flawless episode (with the possible exception of some of the early nineties fashion faux pas by the extras 'the woman with the pony tail slow dancing, grimacing and shrugging at Leland bugs me). The Audrey character continues to blossom and is becoming more and more one of the strongest of the characters, and one we are slowly beginning to feel empathy towards.

Twin Peaks has perhaps the best dream quality to it in world of television. No where is that stronger than the opening shot. The titles open to the beautiful strains of Badalamenti, and we are treated to the turbulent Great Northern waterfall, which fades wonderfully into Audrey's face, lost in her own dream. She appreciates and is part of the same score and imagery the viewer sees, and she shares it with us. It is here that we get another moment when Audrey is alone in her private thoughts, not performing a role; her mask gone. This is an event that will continue to present it self throughout the series 'the private Audrey vs. the public Audrey (a good example is in the second season premiere when she literally lowers a mask when she has dodged her father at One-Eyed Jacks.) The dream doesn't last long for Audrey, for she clearly has a mission. Most likely calculated, she has been waiting for Agent Dale Cooper, and is certainly hoping he will notice her. She reveals a smile, and we get a sense that she is getting a charge out of seeing him. But we now have knowledge that it isn't a game for her, like the Norwegians, but instead a real longing for; in short a crush.

The dreamlike reverie of Audrey here is also interesting since we have only just ended the last episode with Cooper definitely having his own dream.

The Cooper/Audrey breakfast scene is their second in the series, and continues to have the same playful tone. In fact, we've come to expect it, almost becoming a ritual for the kickoff of a Twin Peaks episode. Dressed in ripe red with a plunging neckline, Fenn once again evokes what director Tina Rathborn describes as "very mysterious and powerful in a kind of Marilyn Monroe sort of way." Twin Peaks in itself is not only a straightforward linear story, but also a visceral attack on the senses through imagery and music, saluting and using classic cinematic icons. In this sense, the reference to Marilyn Monroe isn't surprising. After all, Cooper himself will be describes by another character as looking like Cary Grant, and upon meeting Dr. Jacoby, he mistakes Dale for Gary Cooper. So while we can enjoy the characters for what they are, we can also bask in the throwback of using old Hollywood glamour. Essentially, Cooper and Audrey in the real world is probably, um, not such a good idea 'but here it is fantasy, and are both throwbacks to controlled glamor close-ups of movie stars. They exist as cinematic creatures.

But in the narrative, the scene is useful in furthering the Audrey infatuation, Cooper's detective skills, and sets up the perfume counter/One-Eyed Jack's arc to the show.

While we already are aware that Audrey is capable of great manipulation, we know Cooper is better, and her defenses are down. While coyly declaring she's "in a hurry,"when pressed by Cooper she can only shrug with no follow-up. He sets a trap for her instantly by effortless complimenting her perfume, and she falls hook, line and sinker, not even questioning why she would have to write her name down for him. She merely blindly does it. This eagerness is fun to watch in someone who has mostly been always in control. When Audrey catches on to Cooper's trick, she's still under his spell, and finally must come clean 'and there's no pretense or hidden agenda for her: She wanted to help him, "for Laura."

Here we touch on another aspect of twins and mirroring in Twin Peaks. Audrey tells Cooper that although she wasn't friends with Laura, she "understood her better than the rest." Audrey's tone is matter of fact with the agent, no flirtations or her usual armor. We continue to touch base that Audrey is possibly running the same course as the phantom Laura Palmer, has a type of insight that this other girl has. (Battis will hauntingly point this similarity out to Audrey later) 'While not friends, Audrey and Laura are connected beyond Audrey's control.

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Next, we come to Cooper pressing Audrey on the identity of One-Eyed Jacks. She blushes when she tells him, "Men go there women work there." One Eyed Jacks is much more crucial to the Audrey character than the Cooper character and is represents the bridge of innocence and purity that we begin to suspect in Audrey with the seedy underworld of sex, violence and darkness. It can also easily represent a teenage girl's journey from girl into woman. (Audrey will essentially be metaphorically raped at One Eyed Jacks, penetrated by a needle 'but certainly that plot point wasn't even thought out by the time the current episode was written). But more importantly, Cooper helps the audience in furthering identifying with Audrey and separating her from the eccentric characters 'he informs her that her handwriting indicates a "romantic nature,"and even more boldly, "a heart that yearns." In that sentence alone, Audrey has now been elevated for the audience beyond the seemingly sexually aggressive minx to that of a romantic dreamer. Cooper is our trusted hero, and he speaks the truth. We as an audience will accept this. But he also tells Audrey to "be careful"of this trait. A warning, a danger now awaits Audrey, and we expect it and are now concerned for her. The moment of empathy is capped off by her honest reply of thanking Cooper for taking the time to talk to her. There is still the sense of sadness, and that no one gives her the honest attention that he has. The dreamlike quality, coupled with the romantic quality of her nature sets up a semi-fairy tale like aspect to the Audrey character that will continue.

Audrey's next scene is the reveal of another one of her most famous activities; the secret passageway. Slipping into the passageway, the audience is now fully onboard as seeing events through Audrey's eyes 'as the series progresses, we usually learn events the same time she does. Transference has happened. We now no longer observe the Audrey character but are essentially in her shoes. While still a suspect to the murder mystery, we still feel Audrey is on some path here, and believe anything she learns she'll share with Cooper.

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The funeral scene provides a clear cut strong path for the Audrey character. It encapsulates her intended journey for the character 'her longing for Cooper which represents escape and knowledge to a world outside her own, and also her true sense of self. This is provided through the reverend's eulogy of Laura. We see clear shots while he speaks of the towns folks. Connecting a shot of the newly introduced Maddy to Audrey we hear, "most of all, Laura was impatient. Impatient for her life to begin" The camera lingers on Audrey contemplating its meaning and finding a fleeting moment of happiness in Cooper's returned gaze. The words continue ' "and catch up to her dreams and ambitions." The point is more than clearly made. Audrey is smart enough and yet impulsive and reckless enough to follow Laura's path.

All in all, the episode is a great one for Fenn, and is successful in making the audience begin to care for Audrey. It is also successful in making them root for her pursuit of Cooper. From Rathborne's notes ' "we all believed that Coop was going to have an affair with her, showing her in all her glory and then seeing him come down for breakfast seemed to be emotional right." Clearly, the agenda is there then for it not merely to be a plot point for an unrequited crush, but a clear strong bridge between the two characters
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Last edited by Audrey Horne on Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 9:32 pm 
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Audrey 'episode five (1.04)

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Episode five begins a slight shift to the tone of the series. After setting up a mood, a sensual pace, Twin Peaks begins to take a more straightforward action paced narrative over character-centric scenes. It is no less effective, with the viewer no deeply rooted in the whims and motivations of its inhabitants. Certainly this is the case with Audrey, and where once we saw her contemplate the world; we now see her attempting a move active role.

The episode once again setups the two scene per character structure, and both of Audrey's are doozies. Both involve the active arc to Audrey investigating the murder of Laura Palmer presumably to win the affection of the stranger -Agent Cooper. The first is the high school bathroom scene with fellow peer Donna Hayward, the other the more ominous verbal dance with her father, Ben Horne.

The bathroom scene once again brings back the scheming, playful Audrey from the pilot. Badalamenti's music is sly and indicates Audrey is up to her usual Puck-like tricks. Upon her entrance, we know she has an angle and the scene will be a pleasure in finding out what it is. Delivering another of her bon Motts, she wistfully muses to Donna, "I've been doing some research. In real life there is no algebra." Again, it sets the cinematic tone of Technicolor 50's film, where the bad girls smoke and the good girls brush their hair. The bathroom itself is more of a surreal set piece than a realistic high school lavatory 'stark red contrasted against white. It is interesting to note that most of the scene is shot from the point of the view of the mirror, often framing both women in the same shot conversing through the mirror instead of face to face. And in the basic premise of the show, the two fall into perceived roles of the "good girl"and the "bad girl,"while at the same time sharing similar physical traits 'the pale skin and the dark bobbed hair. The twin theme subtly springs up again here, and the mirror reflects what is not only in their being but possible in the other 'one is capable of being both "good"and "bad."

The scene itself is quite fun. There is a verbal game being played by both Donna and Audrey, and somewhat competitive nature. Donna suggesting Audrey "join the circus"again sets the point that Audrey, despite her status, is an outsider in the high school world, a misfit. Unfazed, and probably a perception Audrey already is fully aware of, she volleys back about an older man being her conquest, an "escape." The line itself is bold, and encapsulates the entire arc, motivation and the essence of the character:

"A tall, dark and handsome stranger falls madly in love with me. Takes me away to a life of mystery and international intrigue "

It's a wonderful moment, and brings back the moment of the dreamer for Audrey. The sentence is both fantastic in its impracticality and earnestness; an innocence in the same vein of a teenager daydreaming of going to Hollywood and becoming a movie star; a fantasy. Fenn continues to play Audrey teetering on the edge of cocksure and naiveté, and the viewer actually believes she's quite capable of doing it, there's no cuteness to the declaration.

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The scene continues to thicken the One-Eyed Jacks plot. When Donna innocently asks if is the name of a "western with Marlon Brando"(again saluting cinema), Audrey pauses and corrects her that it's a bordello. It's a wonderful moment of nuanced acting by Fenn. In a split second, it conveys Audrey's impatience and knowledge that most of the world are mere trifles for her. The scene continues to strengthen Audrey's sensuality and curiosity into the adult world, and the possible parallel between her life and Laura's'

"You know I think about it ... I think about Laura being in a place like that and I get all shivery ... but its like a hot cold. Like when ... you hold an ice cube on your bare skin for a long time"

Donna, like others, has to break Audrey's reverie and ground her back into the practical world. When their sleuthing alliance is solidified, Audrey can only respond by giving an uncontrollable smile that seems like a reaction to her body receiving a charge; once again, the impulsive nature at work beyond her control.

It's interesting to note, that Audrey and Donna now split in the narrative. And while, Donna will continue the Laura investigation, it is done in a group. Audrey's will be a solo act, and propel her, along with Cooper, to the forefront of the story. There now seems to be little reason narratively for us to see her as a suspect, and instead, again like Cooper, begin to root for her to solve the mystery.

The Horne study scene is another highlight of the episode, like most Audrey and Ben scenes are. Beymer has always been unappreciated, and nowhere is he better than when he has to put up with Audrey. There's always a tremendous amount of fun when Fenn and he have to spar with one another, and it's the quality writing and the richness and gusto both actors bring to their parts. Again, this scene exhibits the game between father and daughter, both always have an agenda and neither will reveal their hand. The scene is both comical and sad, as they use the guise of tenderness to get what they want. Audrey delivers a treacle line like, "I saw a friend of mine cut down like a flower before it could begin to bloom"with such precision that one can't help laugh. The whole moment seems like a nod to After School specials, that one applauds when Audrey's tactics work. The hug between father and daughter reaches the height of farce. The moment of sophisticated comedy is punctured though when Audrey spies the photo of her and Laura on her father's desk. Again, it evokes that Audrey did understand Laura, and perhaps is going down her same dark path. It also is a snapshot of the town's perfect good girl who we're quickly learning wasn't all that good, and again, the bad girl who probably isn't all that bad. We leave Audrey knowing she will undoubtedly be headed for trouble.

*On a side note, while the Ben/Audrey scene is quite good, the costume choice is quite a dramatic departure for the character. Dressed in a flowing, stark black dress, the look is more gothic than the Daddy's little girl apparel. And while perhaps it is to evoke a more calculated, "angelic"look to fool her father, it is the furthest the character will look from her norm, and breaks a little of the power of the creation.

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Last edited by Audrey Horne on Sun Oct 28, 2007 12:07 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:07 pm 
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Awesome work. Keep them coming. Although, you do know that you will need to rewatch the Episodes again to see the new transfers of the Pilot and first season.

-B


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Audrey, just a quick note to say that I've enjoyed reading these posts. Keep up the good work...

RR

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 4:24 pm 
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dugpa wrote:
Awesome work. Keep them coming. Although, you do know that you will need to rewatch the Episodes again to see the new transfers of the Pilot and first season.


dammit, more work for me. I guess for you guys, I'll suffer through.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 10:08 am 
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Diane, a note -remember to also revisit episode pilot and one in terms of Audrey inadvertantly diverting Ghostwood from happening, and also asking Cooper is he likes her ring.

Audrey plots are only against ones that are plotting or furthering something that goes against the hero or nature itself (nixing Ghostwood perserves nature, Batis is obvious as is her father, her dallies with Bobby are really in essence to save Cooper).

The ring is the first utterance that will obviously play a large theme through the series and movie.

*excited to look at the next two episodes -arguably Audrey's two finest installments.

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Last edited by Audrey Horne on Wed Oct 31, 2007 8:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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other note, Diane, and include it later or edit it. Black, white and red are constant color themes running through the show -even running into the obvious in the last commerical aired -"White Queen, Black Lodge, Red Room."

Observe that the saddle shoes are a great metaphor for the show itself -stark white contrasted against stark black -yin/yang, flip sides, duality lying side by side -the red room also distinctly marks this as well. Audrey also removes the black and white shoes and replaces them with red. Physically she and Cooper also continue the theme -pale white skin and dark black hair, and both in their dream worlds surrounded by red. (red curtains for both -Audrey at one-eyed Jacks is a nice wink to the red draps at the red room itself.)

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