"Do your palms ever itch?" All things Audrey

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Audrey Horne
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episode 1.05

Postby Audrey Horne » Sun Oct 21, 2007 9:35 pm

Audrey 'episode six (1.05)

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The sixth outing for Twin Peaks is fascinating because it deals specifically with the twin theme 'or more aptly the flip side to someone's personality. Again, the series is gaining steam in the action department; every setup is now commencing into the physical instead of the mental 'Ben literally tells Josie, "then we can proceed." And that is what many of the characters do before the final act closing the season: Audrey takes the first step in actively investigating Laura's activities, Ben pushes the button on the mill, and Shelly actively takes a stance on Leo. The revelation in the twin element (or again, the flip side) is dramatically revealed in Bobby during his visit to Dr. Jacoby, and in Josie's surprise involvement with diabolical Ben Horne, and most certainly in Audrey Horne. This is certainly nothing new in the serial/Soap Opera genre, but here Twin Peaks adapts it, spoofs it, and enriches it all at the same time.

Episode six breaks the usual pattern for Audrey in keeping with the two scenes per character norm, and begins to give her a more parallel template keeping with Cooper and Truman 'which makes sense since both storylines are the most active in terms of solving the mystery. Audrey has progressed through the previous episodes from a set piece, or observed quirky character, to one of the prime characters the audience identifies with, she starts to become our eyes and ears.

Audrey's first scene is the breakfast meeting with Cooper. Again, this is becoming the norm for the show, and the audience sees it as ritual, a kickoff for the show, the beginning of both Cooper and Audrey's day. We anticipate the scene, and expect it to have comedic overtones, and a fun verbal game. Who will get the upper hand over the other this day?

I personally love this quick scene because although nothing momentous happens, to me in encapsulates Twin Peaks at its best 'the bouncy music of Freshly Squeezed, the chemistry between MacLachlan and Fenn, the importance of what is unspoken, and the simple playful writing. Also, based on their costumes, it must have been when most of Twin Peaks promos were taken, and Cooper and Audrey's Double R diner shots are my favorite photos of all time.

Where was I? Oh yeah. Audrey commences with yet another round of calculated flirting. Cooper has little patience for the game today due to his lack of sleep from the boisterous Icelanders. In fact, he's barely listening to her. In pure plot device; missing the info she has to tell him in order to keep the story going. But hey, it's very, very good plot device. Audrey in turn is barely listening to Cooper also 'she feigns interest in his sleep depravation, with her studied pout, but slowly slides into her probably rehearsed manner of sharing her new info with her Special Agent '"I got a job! and now maybe I thought I could help you with your case." Cooper, obviously preoccupied, shuts her down completely with the declaration of her status '"I thought Wednesdays were traditionally a school day when I was your age." Game over, and Cooper is ready to move on. Audrey, not missing a beat, is not ready to let her daily meeting go so easily. She sidles up under his nose and coos, "I can't believe you were ever my age." She has made certain she is on Cooper's radar now, and he is brought back into her game. Cooper is transfixed by Audrey's charm now, but still has the control to ask her how old she is, clearly attracted to the vixen but clarifying, and making just doubly sure. Possibly seeing if his libido will listen to reason. Audrey makes no pretense is proudly declaring that she is in fact eighteen, really saying she is in fact of a perfectly legal age of consent. It's a tremendously fun scene, as the verbal dance continues between the two. Cooper remains fixed on her gaze before calmly and coolly telling her that he'll "see her later"(the double meaning is all too apparent). Cooper has once again, won the game and defused the situation with Audrey once again. And capping off the hilarity, Fenn keeps Audrey dazed, in a starry eyed stupor. She tries to remain composed but her lack of wit can only come up with a parroted retort, "See you later, bye" It's a nice variation on the old "call me"gag. Fenn continues to give a great spin on the character. She plays Audrey not as a vamping femme fatale, but as a woman trying to vamp as a femme fatale, and it's amusing when the act fails her.

However, Audrey's next scene is one that in fact let's her not fail. The Horne's Department Store scene revisits Audrey's early charming tactics that we haven't seen since the pilot. Emory Batis is introduced, and almost immediately we recognize Audrey will make mincemeat out of the cloddish sycophant. A throwback to film noir (the office, the blinds, the average business man and the attractive young woman meeting for the first time) the scene provides us with seeing Audrey's strength in manipulation and getting exactly what she wants. She hits a slight speed bump when Batis tells her she'll be spending time in the wrapping department. She breaths the information in quickly, processes and commences into a new tactic. It's yet another fun moment, and the music cues us in that Audrey is going to do what she does best. The suspense in the scene is hardly about whether Audrey will secure the perfume position, but instead how she will get what she wants. Her move fuses together her best assets, the little girl sensitivity coupled with her bombshell appeal. We learn Audrey is not only an expert negotiator ("because if you don't, I'm going to rip my dress in half, and scream at the top of my lungs and tell my father you made a pass at me") but also practical in getting down to brass tacks: "So, should we get started on the paper work?" It's yet another winner of a scene for the mischievous Audrey.

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*It's interesting to note, and will certainly become more clear as the series goes on, that Audrey's machination and scheming are always in direct conflict to someone plotting for something that is seedy or fundamentally wrong 'Batis is running a prostitution agency, the Norwegians were going to rape and damage the pure land, Bobby is the currier for the blackmailing of Cooper, etc. Audrey may be the "bad girl,"but she is truly the foil to the real badness that threatens the purity of that which surrounds her.

The next series of scenes for Audrey are perhaps her most important in ultimately establishing her as the primal heroine of the series, and one the audience empathetically identifies with. There may have been hints of it prior (the diner moment for example), but by the end of this episode, the viewers fully understand her motives.

The gala for the Icelanders provides plenty of good Soap Opera fodder, lots of juicy information flies at us 'Ben and Catherine set the plan in motion to burn the mill, but Josie is actually in cahoots with Ben in a double cross to Catherine. It's pure television fantasy. What sets it apart is Audrey's involvement as an observer. With her inquisitive look towards Ben and Catherine's private conversation, Audrey furtively enters her secret passageway and spies on the duo. In this passageway, Audrey shares her private moments with the audience, and takes them with her on her journey, allowing them to discover the same information that she does. She will be our eyes and ears, and we at the same time, are put in her shoes as well. Shot mostly through her point of view through the peephole, we sense if Audrey is caught we also will be caught. She engages us to be the voyeur with her. It's a dark scene that is again punctured by Piper Laurie's expert hilarity she brings to Catherine. When Catherine slaps Ben, it sends a jolt through Audrey. She winces in glee. It's practically a sexual charge for the girl. Observing the adult world by a clandestine placement, with the thrill of possibly being caught recalls MacLachlan's closet scenes in Blue Velvet. Audrey also learns of the plot to burn down the mill, while at the same time doesn't seem to be fazed by her father's adulterous nature. In a curious but bold choice, Fenn allows Audrey to observe the situation but then laugh about the situation. It isn't a laugh that seems to be enjoying the situation, but one that seems on the brink of madness at learning of all the absurdity of life around her.

The next snippet of Audrey is brief, but perhaps her most important in defining the entire essence of the character. The famous scene at the gala reaches its climax when Jerry's speech is interrupted by blaring music bringing Leland to his frenzied dance of grief. Ben employs Catherine to dance with Leland in order for a scene not to be made in front of the Icelanders and their much needed funding. The scene is comedic genius with Leland's expressions parodied into a dance routine by all in the room. The dance and the gala has become a hit, but all at the expense of a man and the grief over his dead daughter. The truth of the situation hits home as Audrey watches the madness from the sidelines, hidden in her corner, and uncontrollable weeps. It's a fascinating moment. And one we're not prepared for, and sobers the viewer up from the initial comedic tone of the scene. Audrey is able to see the truth of the situation. The world is full of monsters. It is one of Twin Peaks finest moments.

*It has been mentioned in Wrapped in Plastic that Audrey is the culprit in putting the music on during the gala to once again disrupt the new business deal. I had never thought that when originally watching the show over the years. While it's a definite possibility and would be keeping with her character, I still think it's too vague to determine. Frankly, I like the ambiguity.

The episode ends on something we've been expecting 'the actual active moment between Cooper and Audrey. We knew it would come where something would have to be acknowledged, but the surprise here is that the tone has shifted. Their next meeting is not playful or comical, but fully emotionally loaded. She has slipped into his hotel room bed, naked. While this could have been the bold move we expected, the situation is not met with verbal game play or posturing on her part, but real heartfelt tears. "Don't make me leave. Please, don't make me leave,"she quietly pleads to Agent Cooper who can only look on with confusion and concern. There is no comedic overtone anymore. The audience leaves the episode obviously on the edge of their seat, but more importantly with a better understanding and compassion for Audrey Horne.

*One could ask why Audrey would make a ridiculous bold move like this when she needs to be comforted. I think it's telling to her nature that she again is losing control of her emotions and has no one in her life to talk to. Cooper, or the idea of Cooper, offers the answer to how adults would act, or the fantasy of making things alright. Again, she is mimicking the actions of the fantasy world without understanding its full consequences. In the movies, the hero makes love to the heroine and everything will be fine. It's Audrey the viewer, the voyeur, the outsider, trying to connect to a tangible by any means how.

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Last edited by Audrey Horne on Sun Nov 04, 2007 12:07 pm, edited 4 times in total.
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?
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Postby Audrey Horne » Tue Oct 23, 2007 7:13 pm

Episode 1.06 coming. It's one of my favorites of all time, of Twin Peaks and any other television show, so I don't want to rush it.

But I realize the differences between the original drafts or the script and what was filmed has been ignored -they've been minor up until this point anyway. The next episode has a major deviation that has to be explored. But so far, the most interesting change has been from the funeral episode. In the written version, Audrey is already on the case, and drawn into the detective aspect...

Madeleine looks up, sees Nadine peering at her from across the grave.

Madeleine looks away, only to find Audrey staring at her from the other side.

Audrey notes the resemblance to Laura, reacts.

Audrey looks to find Agent Cooper in the throng, she wants him to see it too.

And as for Cooper, he's been watching this chain from the start, fascinated by all the connections and clues it offers him.


While the filmed version is quite exciting, and offers the similar montage of characters reacting and paralled to the sermon, this tidbit connects Audrey directly to the phantom Laura. Studying Maddie and delving into the twin/duality aspect.
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?
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Postby Audrey Horne » Tue Oct 23, 2007 7:31 pm

an interesting bit of information was removed, or never filmed from the Cooper/Audrey first meeting in episode 1.01.

Audrey is more of a smart alleck citing Laura as "Little Miss Perfect" most likely based on no knowing entirely the rythyms Fenn would bring to the character yet. But here she mentions Troy the pony. Most likely, this was material and backstories that were given to Jennifer Lynch for her book -but the pony (some say, the White Horse) was formed this early.


My father bought it for me. My father
was crazy about Laura. He bought her
a pony when she was nine, but he let
her father say it was from him. Its
name was Troy.
(absent-mindedly rubs
her left palm)
Do your palms ever itch?
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?
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Postby dcsch » Wed Oct 24, 2007 12:04 pm

Great series of posts, Audrey!

Audrey was always my favorite TP character from the first broadcast of the pilot on. I have been a long time lurker on all the Twin Peak sites but seeing your posts have prompted me to actually register.

Keep sharing your ideas in this thread.

And thanks!
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Postby Audrey Horne » Wed Oct 24, 2007 12:47 pm

Thanks!! And share your as well.

I'll probably talk about the offseason too during the summer of 1990 -which in itself was pretty big.

And not to keep it all gushing, but there's plenty of critisms of the character towards the middle of the second season from me, but in regards to the first season especially, I would say Audrey Horne and Agent Cooper are two of the strongest creations in television history -up there with Archie and Edith, Sam and Diane, Lucy,Mary Richards, JR Ewing etc, etc, etc, etc.
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?
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Postby Audrey Horne » Wed Oct 24, 2007 8:18 pm

It was going to be talked about in the next episode, but from a screening of the Gold dvd -the deleted scene with Audrey. I knew off this scene, but never knew Audrey was actually in it. It's quite good, an a great glimpse to see her relationship with her mother is equally strained as the one with her father. And gives her even more reason to impulsively flee to One Eyed Jacks and try to latch onto Cooper and solving the mystery.


(Audrey stands outside one of the offices of the Great Northern, and listens. She hears Johnny scream and runs in to see Jacoby and Sylvia Horne struggling with Johnny.)

Dr. Jacoby: Let me handle this, Mrs. Horne.
Sylvia: Johnny, stop it, this instant.
Dr. Jacoby: Laura isn't coming coming back, Johnny, can you hear what I'm saying.

Audrey finally barges in to find the three struggling on the floor and runs to help.

Sylvia: (to Audrey) Just stay out of this! Just stay out of this!
Audrey: Stop it, you're hurting him, mother!

(Jacoby and Audrey free Johnny to one side of the room while Slyvia crawls on the floor)

Dr. Jacoby: It's all right, Mrs. Horne.

Sylvia: No, it's not all right.

(she crawls up and pounces on Johnny again)

Audrey (pulling Sylvia away from Johnny): Leave him alone, mother! God, you never left him, that's why he's like this.

Sylvia: You little bitch. You think it's me? It's all your fault he's like this.

Audrey: What are you talking about?

Sylvia: Johnny was fine. YOU pushed him down the stairs. It was Thanksgiving morning and we were getting ready to go, Johnny was nine, you came running up and you pushed him and he fell all the way down the stairs and hit his head. It's all YOUR fault.

(Audrey looks at her mother then to Johnny and runs out of the room, Jacoby attempts to go after her)

Dr. Jacoby: Audrey?

(he returns to Sylvia)

Dr. Jacoby: Sylvia, you've got to go after her, you've got to speak to her.

Sylvia: I can't. I won't.

Dr. Jacoby: What you said to her is just not true. Johnny's condition is not the result of a fall. His facilities are completely intact. He's chosen to be a child.

Sylvia: Why?

Dr. Jacoby: He's made this choice to escape some early emotional trauma. If we can unearth his secret, maybe, just maybe we can bring Johnny back to us again.
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?
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Postby Jerry Horne » Wed Oct 24, 2007 8:28 pm

I thought this was Sylvia Horne's best scene. Ironic that it was cut.
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Postby Audrey Horne » Wed Oct 24, 2007 8:48 pm

It's a great scene, and it's a shame Sylvia and Johnny are basically removed from the series. It's very fascinating, and adds layers upon layers to not only Audrey, but also Benjamin.

The potential of the Audrey/Sylvia dynamic could have been first rate. She basically resents Audrey.
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Postby harmolodic » Thu Oct 25, 2007 4:51 am

Great posts, AH. Good writing and interesting analysis.
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Postby Audrey Horne » Sun Oct 28, 2007 10:29 am

Audrey 'episode seven (1.06)

*Sherilyn Fenn receieved her Emmy nomination for this episode.

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The beginning of the next episode begins differently than we expect. When we last left Cooper and Audrey, the air was thick. Cooper had his gun drawn, and Audrey was sobbing. Instead, a brief amount of time has passed where Cooper has made his way to the edge of the bed, and is now sitting with the confused girl. The scene is no longer presented with any danger or possible sexual fulfillment, but now quietness, softness and compassion. It's a surprising and wonderful change compared to the scenes we've become accustomed to 'Shelly and Bobby's primal pawing, James and Donna's cooing, Ben and Catherine's sadistic interplay. Here we have Cooper placed on one side of the bed and Audrey on the distant other side, divided but bridging the gap by talking and listening to one another.

Audrey is completely exposed emotionally and of course literally. She is in fact, naked to Cooper, true in the physical sense, but more in the fact that her mask is dropped. She has none of the postures and machinations she usually deploys for her games and schemes; she is reduced to her raw nature and is revealing nothing but her essence of truth to the Agent.

Audrey is clearly processing the situation, and in quiet desperation simply asks, "But don't you like me?" There is a simple naïve charm to this question. While it is revealed much later in the series about her virtue, it should be clear now to the viewer, that Audrey has no real understanding of the adult world but instead has been putting up a front of how she perceives sexually advanced adult women would behave. But through and through, she is an innocent.

Cooper continues on that he in fact does like her, she's "smart, beautiful, desirable, everything a man wants in his life"'again, since this is Cooper, he speaks the truth and gives the audience his approval of the Audrey character, and we therefore no matter what her schemes will be, will follow his lead. "But what you really need is a friend, someone who will listen,"Cooper concludes. Again, he has confirmed our suspicions from the previous episode for how we are to view Audrey. Audrey accepts the offering '"Friends, huh?"and a new partnership is solidified. Cooper will stay with her to listen to the real Audrey, and allow her to be who she really is. I believe the scene to be one of the most surprising and rewarding in Twin Peaks. It is far more enriching than if Cooper had bedded Audrey, or more comic relief of again diffusing the character. Now Cooper has another alliance on the show, the other being his friendship with Truman. Audrey is now his young "Sherlock", a deputy Cooper in training. It strengthens our investment in her character as she investigates deeper into the mystery of the murder. The chemistry between MacLachlan and Fenn is magnificent, and there is still the strong sexual charm between them, but the scene has now solidified the two being connected more intellectually and spiritually. It is one examples of a scene representing the heart of Twin Peaks.

Continuing to represent the series, Audrey sighs to Cooper, "I can't tell you all my secrets." Cooper tells Audrey and the audience that "Secrets are dangerous things." Of course they are. The series is nothing but one secret wrapped in another, and we're finding out how deadly they can be. Audrey asks the hero if he has any secrets, in which he tells her quickly and with no hesitation, "No." Cooper may have a past (as has been hinted in the previous episode at the firing range) but he has nothing he has to hide. He is the pure one in the series; based on this purity has the ability to see and actively seek out the answers. Audrey will also now come clean throughout the night with Dale about all her secrets. She will now also be pure and able to actively seek out the answers as well, becoming essentially a Cooper in training. Audrey continues to tell Cooper, "Laura had a lot of secrets." Again, Audrey is parallel with Laura but once Audrey comes clean with her secrets it is a possible salvation and aversion to meeting Laura's fate. Cooper looks Audrey squarely in the eyes and tells her, "Finding those out is my job."Once again, Cooper is the voice of authority and informs Audrey and us that his job will be carried out.

The scene has a wonderful cap to it as Cooper will return to Audrey with malts and fries and talk throughout the night about all that is troubling her. The simplicity of this is wonderful. What was originally heightened soap opera melodrama, has now found its truth in a picture of shared innocence evoking a Norman Rockwell painting. Sherilyn Fenn ends the scene with a brilliant moment of starry-eyed reverie. If anything, Audrey loves Cooper all the more.

Image

*It is interesting to compare how the episode was originally conceived. When first written we begin the episode starting off the following morning, with Cooper and Audrey having breakfast together. We are never told or shown what has happened the previous night. Cooper can not make eye contact with Audrey, and she lovingly fixates on him throughout the whole scene. We are uncertain if Cooper has followed through with a consummation with Audrey, but clearly the two have been alone together throughout the night. Audrey is the aggressor is the scene declaring to Dale that "they"will find out Laura's secrets. He tells her to keep her mind on school, again reinforcing her status in life. Audrey balks at his request. "Homework's for kids. I'm a working girl now."The scene ends with her charmingly offering Cooper syrup for his meal. While the scene is in keeping with the previous well-written Cooper/Audrey moments, it doesn't have the full impact and deeper connection than that which was finally filmed.
Audrey has so many golden moments in this episode, it's hard to keep up with them and give them the full attention they deserve. In fact, she begins to rival Agent Cooper as the central protagonist with the shear amount of screen time and the weight to her story arc.

Her next scene is back at Horne's Department Store, and here we get to see mini Agent Audrey at work, using her own specialty spin on her detective work. To regain the playful quality of the character, we see Audrey's hunt deterred by actually waiting on a costumer for an actual perfume product. The potential buyer is an older woman, but is shot only from behind, a faceless entity. It is a kickoff to a terrific comedic sequence. The woman (an extreme comic busybody type) wants a scent that "makes a statement."Audrey spies that Battis has made an aside to fellow worker Jenny, and needs to work fast in uncovering the information. "Why don't you try hanging it around your neck,"she advises her customer/victim. "It's a perfume, it's a fashion accessory. Two things for the price of one." Mission accomplished. No sale, but the diversion is moved off Audrey's chess board. Next move, she tells the easy pawn that she has to use the "little girl's room"and excuses herself. Her mission is Battis' office and then faces another problem in one of the drones stocking shoes outside her goal. Without missing a beat, Audrey takes out another pawn to reach her destination. "You know there's a real bad accident outside,"she innocently lulls to the lunkhead, "It sounded like a bus or something." Second mission accomplished, as the inconsequential boy pauses and then darts out of Audrey's way. Audrey is easily able to leapfrog to the end of the board and find out the information she needs.

In a moment of directorial genius, Caleb Deschanel allows Sherilyn Fenn to take one of Battis' cigarettes and place herself in the office closet, and smoke the cigarette! Battis returns to the room now with the impressionable Jenny in tow, while Audrey can observe them practically in plain sight. The scene again represents one of Twin Peaks strengths, and Audrey's as well. This is not a show that is concerned with real life practicalities despite grounded in character truth. It is stylized storytelling. It is cinema. The power of the image is more important than the analyzing the improbability of the event. While Battis shares with Jenny the information of One Eyed Jacks, Audrey can spy on the two and still be in her own private world. She has the power of invisibility over these two, smarter than both of them combined, and that is why she is allowed to smoke her cigarette 'even become bored with the two inferiors and find scrutinizing her nails more interesting. The director could have filmed the scene with Audrey lying across Battis' desk in plain sight, and we would still buy it. This reinforces that Audrey is very good at getting out of any situation, and can outthink virtually all other around her. The irony of course is that the bold Audrey actually will find herself "over her head"at One Eyed Jacks and not be able to get out of the situation. The present scene is a trifle, but we sense she is still going to be walking into a very dire danger in the near future.

Image

Continuing the Cooper/Audrey connection, it is hard to brush off the visual image of Audrey hiding in the closest and spying through the vats, the shadows hitting her face. This of course, recalls MacLachlan's scene in Blue Velvet spying on Isabella Rossellini's character. The shot is reversed in this case. Kyle's point of view is looking right, Sherilyn's is looking left 'they are mirrored images. And Kyle's character is also on the brink of adulthood tiptoeing into the adult world.

Writer Harley Peyton talks of the scene on the first season DVD commentary, and breaks it down quite nicely-

"I think we all have our favorite characters and the ones we love to write. I love to write Audrey Horne because I thought she was really sexy, and she tended to put up a challenge with whoever she was in a scene with, just as a character and also, I think, as an actress. Sherilyn Fenn did that as well. So I liked writing Audrey a great deal. David is not above or below a fetish, and I think in this sense the character of Audrey was kind of fetishized. She had her saddle shoes and sweater sets. And Sherilyn was just amazingly sexy, and I think also very, very smart. And the smart part was something that emerged more and more as you went through the show because she was trying to figure out things on her own, and she was trying to discover in service of her feelings for Agent Cooper, who killed Laura Palmer. And I always thought her strength in the show was very, very interesting. She was someone who seemed rather fearless, where some of the other characters were less so, and that always made her fun to write, particularly as she got into her own investigation of what happened leading of course to One Eyed Jacks."

Audrey's parts in the episode quickly cuts back and forth between Cooper's as both lead their own investigation. After Cooper has given Harry his "present for the day"'a nice steaming cup of coffee- Badalamenti's playful horns move back to Audrey finishing up a hard day's work at the perfume counter. Again, her eye is more on Jenny than the actual job. In yet another example of Audrey's expert cunning, she tricks the befuddled Jenny into giving her the number for the mysterious Black Rose. Jenny, like before, is just another piece on the playing field for Audrey to meet her objective. The day has ended with Audrey receiving the One Eyed Jacks lead, and she makes a phone call from the number Jenny supplies her, most likely to confirm that it is a front for recruiting young girls. Does Audrey make an appointment to further her own investigation, or is she merely waiting to supply Cooper with the information? It's unclear, but the viewer must certainly feel Audrey is on a collision course with Jacks.

Continuing with the cuts between Audrey and Cooper, the next scene is pure convention of the classic missed connection. Cooper appears in his tuxedo, or more aptly, as Cary Grant. He and Truman supply the setup for the viewer that they will be heading for danger at the nefarious One Eyed Jacks, and leave. And in perfect narrative form, Audrey seeking Cooper, arrives only seconds after he has left. Since the bedroom scene between the two earlier, the audience has an investment in Audrey that expands beyond the charms of seducing Cooper. We want her to get the information to her Special Agent, but also feel she will be continuing the dangerous mission solo. "Yes, it's still urgent,"she tells the concierge on the phone in relaying a message to Cooper. Audrey's pleas to the management and irritated reply indicate that her request is not taken seriously, and Audrey is more or less, the Boy Who Called Wolf.

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Audrey's next segment is a quick wonderful scene all about mood and tone. A camera begins on her saddle shoes (already an iconic image for the series and instantly alerting the viewer to who the character is before the face is revealed) and then her hand slipping a note under a door. Again, there is no need for explaining what or whom the note is for. We've already seen this before in the third episode from Cooper's perspective, now we see it from Audrey's. Badalamenti's lonely music accompanies Audrey again, as she caresses Cooper's door, overnight bad in hand, and runs her finger alongside the wall. She's snapped out of her daydream, by encountering a mysterious Asian gentlemen checking into a nearby room. He silently greets her, but Audrey continues her pace eyes fixated on the stranger. What does it mean? Who is the man? Is he a sign of good fortune, or a warning to Audrey to go back the way she came?

*A deleted scene has occurred in this episode that is pivotal to Audrey, lost likely cut simply due to time constraints in an already jam packed episode. Presumably this takes place after Audrey has tried to contact Cooper. Audrey overhears Johnny's screams from a nearby room; she quickly enters to find Johnny in a scuffle with Dr. Jacoby and her mother. She aids Dr. Jacoby in securing Johnny. When she tells her mother to leave Johnny alone, Mrs. Horne drops a bomb on Audrey '"You little bitch,"Sylvia coldly retorts to her daughter. She informs her that Audrey, herself, is the sole reason that her brother is mentally disabled; Audrey impulsively pushed him down the stairs when both were young. Audrey stunned and noticeably upset, bolts from the room. Dr. Jacoby pleads for the mother to talk with Audrey, only to find Sylvia incapable of such compassion '"I can't. I won't." Jacoby tells Sylvia that Johnny's condition is not a result of a fall, and Audrey is not to blame. While the episode with the cut works fine, this added inclusion would further explain Audrey's reckless, determination in her pursuit of One Eyed Jacks 'almost to correct a wrong herself, or find solace in solving Laura's murder firsthand in an act of redemption. The scene is important again in making the audience feel more empathy towards the misunderstood bad girl.

**Another note -viewers have asked how Audrey makes her change back into her saddle shoes and school clothes at the end of the second season's second episode. Clearly, she is wearing the same outfit here, and like how she changes into the red shoes in the pilot, she is curiouring the interview outfit in the overnight bag, and will change to and from the costume safely away from her father.


And of course, there's one final scene for Audrey 'something about a cherry stem.

The One Eyed Jacks moment between Audrey, Blackie and a twisted little piece of vine catapulted Fenn and Audrey to instant pop culture iconoclasm, and is still to this day one of Twin Peaks most lasting legacies. But the scene itself, is a good, solid one with continued expert writing by Peyton. Audrey again continues to challenge herself by sticking herself in difficult situations, and this time she practically opens the lion's head and peers inside. The interview with Blackie finally matches Audrey with a formidable opponent, and eventually down the line it will prove costly 'to both Audrey and Blackie. This is Blackie's second episode, and here we learn more about her tact and her business, not to mention her overt sexuality, which is subtly peaked by young Audrey. Blackie is another vehicle linking Cooper and Audrey. Previously meeting Cooper and dubbing him as Cary Grant, Blackie reminds us that we are watching fantasy, and she is the foil, albeit a smart, slinky one. Once Audrey enters Blackie lair, we already know this will be the toughest hurdle for Audrey to clear, and we're finally not sure if she can accomplish it. Audrey's fake resume is amusing, and frankly, in a word, cute. It again reinforces that while she is a person of considerable intelligence, she is still only a child and can only evoke the adult world. She uses exaggerated terms like "Lost Dude Ranch"for previous brothels of her employ, and the topper for an alias: Hester Prynne. One instantly laughs at the comedic situation; no doubt Audrey Horne just finished reading The Scarlet Letter for English class. Audrey's decoy is absurd and easily realized by Blackie who crumpled up the resume before Audrey's eyes. As we've suspected there is no escape this time for Ms. Horne, and we anticipate the conventional setup of her being detected and in trouble by the standard bad guys. "Give me one good reason I shouldn't air-mail your bottom back to civilization,"Blackie challenges. The next moment is nothing short of surprise, and again is ludicrous in practical terms. But this is a fantasy of stylization and aesthetics, a continued play on Soap Opera themes. Fenn's use of Audrey's control ease with the situation is first rate. Audrey, like any good master strategist, surveys the situation, and rests her eyes on Blackie's drink. Methodically, she plucks the cherry out of the drink, and boldly bites the fruit. Eyes firmly on her challenger, Audrey places the stem in her mouth, and with the help of Badalementi and an amusing close-up shot, removes the stem and places on Blackie's napkin. The product itself is equally deserving of its own close-up, revealing itself neatly place and amply tied into a perfect heart shaped knot. If you listen closely, one can still hear the applause of the 1990 audience. Audrey gives a half smirk to Blackie, as she knows she has won the match. A defeated Blackie can only hand over the contract '"Sign here, Hester. Welcome to One Eyed Jacks." Obviously, no questions need to be asked with these qualifications.

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While the scene is a hit on a complete basic level, it also continues to add to Audrey's character. We must note that Audrey enters into this world surrounded by the color red. Red has been a strange and mysterious color punctuating the world of Twin Peaks, with its strongest representation in the red drapes of the dream world. These drapes will also be found in Leo's cabin where horrible events have taken place, and now in One Eyed Jacks 'both adult worlds, both Laura has entered and met an untimely demise. Red has represented the adult world and the mysterious world, and also in its most basic meaning is used as warning, or a STOP, danger ahead. Until now, Audrey had only flirted with this adult world 'sliding on the red pumps in the pilot, putting on the low cut red blouse to daydream about escape with Agent Cooper. Now, she has entered the domain of danger and the very serious adult world, which we intuit she is not ready for. Audrey is now exposed to real life-threatening danger.

The cherry steam twist also adds to the character. While it is a good gag, it is also an indication that Audrey has powers beyond her years. The cherry and its stem, also red, signify sex. While Audrey is an innocent, she has special talents in understanding and manipulating the base desires of her inferiors. And we must also take note that Audrey manipulates and schemes only against the ones perpetuating harm, exploitation and other such deeds.
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?
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Postby Audrey Horne » Wed Oct 31, 2007 7:06 pm

I went to my other favorite Twin Peaks site today -Jerry Horne's -and I flipped out when he had a link to a comprehensive Audrey thread. And I'm not too swift -I thought it would take me to some great articles. But low and behold it lead me back here. I laughed at how dumb I was.

And now just honored. Thank you, Jerry Horne! You're the best.

AND I STILL LOVE YOUR SITE!
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Postby Jerry Horne » Wed Oct 31, 2007 7:49 pm

No, thank you for this thread! I look forward to reading it once i get through all the episodes...
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Postby They-Shot-Waldo! » Thu Nov 01, 2007 6:23 pm

This is absolutely incredible stuff. :) I've long felt the Cooper\Audrey friendship is at the heart of Cooper's connection to Twin Peaks - and the first season in general. One of the most missed aspects of the episodes that is lost between seasons is Audrey sitting down to breakfast with Cooper as he starts of his day. The more I think about it, the writers even fumbled the ball not only dropping the relationship completely from the series - but contemplating getting the two characters properly together in the first place. How thematically powerful would it have been Earle abducting Audrey into the Black Lodge?

I sincerely believed Cooper\Audrey would have been revisited in the third season, (particularly as it remains my belief Annie's double-meaning line in the last episode, "I saw the face of the man who killed me." marked her for death).
-- Gerry

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Postby Audrey Horne » Fri Nov 02, 2007 6:58 pm

How thematically powerful would it have been Earle abducting Audrey into the Black Lodge?


I don't know. I guess we'll have to wait and see in the analysis over the next few episodes if gee, there were any possible clues for that to happen. Here's a hint: THERE ARE! tons of them.

I'll try for episode the finale tonight -we begin to delve into the fairy tale aspect of the character, and the allusions to the red room and the queen element of Audrey.

*also I should clean up the posts too, and fix the awful grammer mistakes that make me cringe -I wrote these pretty quickly and should proofread before I post. But I'm having an awful lot of fun doing this. I think we should do it for every character.
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Postby Audrey Horne » Sun Nov 04, 2007 1:47 pm

Audrey 'episode 8 (1.07)

The first season finale is crucial to the Audrey character, as it will be with several others, in terms of putting her in extreme jeopardy. This is of no surprise. A gimmick is needed in hooking and luring the viewing audience back for a second season, and since Twin Peaks has its roots in the nighttime soap/serial, it lends itself perfectly for piling cliffhanger upon cliffhanger. There's a strong wink by director/creator Mark Frost that they are knowingly taking this to extremes. By the end of the season, Catherine, Shelly, Pete, Leo and Nadine's lives are in question; Audrey's cover may be blown, and of course Cooper is shot -in a nod to the biggest television mystery of all time, Dallas' Who Shot JR?

However much fun this gimmick is, it also works from a dramatic standpoint, after all we still care about these characters and are invested in their plights. Lucy, Shelly, Nadine and others mirror our own curiosity by their devotion to Invitation to Love.

So in negating the cliffhanger analysis, I'll look at how the character of Audrey progresses in terms of themes and character. She has three scenes in this episode, like most of the other characters 'basically an establishing scene, followed by a loose end moment.

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Audrey's first scene is a continuation of her entering One Eyed Jacks. Previously she has nailed her audition, and entered the dangerous world in her pursuit of finding Laura's killer. She has met with Blackie O'Riley, who has presented Audrey with her biggest challenge so far. Audrey had managed to still achieve her goal, but Blackie's hesitation towards Audrey indicates that Audrey may not have gotten away undetected. Prior to Audrey's first scene, we are shown scenes of Cooper's undercover investigation at the brothel 'both he and Audrey are unaware of the other's presence 'and again, OEJs is established as a place of danger. Leaving the main floor, we cut to the more intimate surroundings of Blackie's lair, and Audrey is led to the Madame. Previously, Audrey was dressed in stark black but now she has been transformed into the Jacks uniform. The costume differs from the other working girls. Where the main girls are wearing nothing but severe corsets, Audrey is presented and framed to Blackie in a shear white lace, bellowing jacket, with traces of red bows adorning it. It's a softer look, and sets her apart from the rest of the inhabitants.

The costume choice for Audrey coupled with the rich red curtains and the ominous flowered wallpaper recalls imagery of the fairy tale. Despite being essentially dressed in brothel-ware, Audrey is set up a semi fairy tale princess in a dark world. She looks like a post modern Snow White. The visual clearly reinforces her purity and innocence surrounded by a world of monsters.

"Come in,"Blackie beckons the new girl. Audrey enters and then is instructed to turn around, while Blackie appraises the new goods. Here Audrey is clearly presented as the pure innocent, and also revealed in full movie star presentation. Her image is meant to be reinforced and imprinted on the viewer. "Very nice,"Blackie informs us about the character of Audrey. More aptly, Audrey is fresh almost ripe fruit for the taking 'again exposing Audrey to danger. Alone with Audrey, Blackie leers at the girl, and we sense that Audrey's pan-like attraction isn't exclusive to the male sex. While Audrey maintains her poker face, she is slightly thrown off her game when she spies her Special Agent on the surveillance camera. Cary Grant is on the premises for Audrey, and the hero and heroine are again tied together for the viewer. Both are in potential danger, but neither is capable of helping the other. It raises the dramatic stakes for Audrey. The man she has been trying to help is close but far away. Again, this missed encounter is plot convention 'but very, very good plot convention. Also, has Blackie picked up on Audrey's knowledge, and is she on to Audrey's identity? Is Audrey getting in deeper and deeper?

Next, Audrey is instructed to pick a card. This actually entices Audrey 'she is good at games, after all. And is this a game of chance? Audrey coolly and calmly surveys the decks and fingers the card of her choice 'the Queen of Diamonds. She holds her hand on the card, while Blackie places her hand on top of Audrey's. Whether Audrey likes it or not, she is in union with Blackie 'Audrey may possess the Queen card, but Blackie now possesses Audrey. She has a hold on Audrey both figuratively and literally, and Audrey knows this. Audrey has selected the Queen of Diamonds, and it is a nice, strong visual. The Queen of Diamonds is of course in the red suite. The Queen of Diamonds also recalls the fairy tale element. Audrey is again in a mythical fantasy world of monsters, Queens, and soon hunchbacks. There is of course, Alice in Wonderland recalled here. Audrey again is the little girl in the dark fairy tale. Curiously, the character has picked the Queen of Diamonds and not the Queen of Hearts. Queen of Hearts naturally seems like a more suitable pick for the narrative of Audrey 'the lonely lovesick girl with the longing heart, and the Queen of Hearts is the main villain in Alice in Wonderland. But since Twin Peaks so far has references so many famous films of noir and suspense up to this point (Laura, Vertigo, Sunset Boulevard), the decision to make the card Diamonds and not Hearts is a natural one. The Queen of Diamonds was made famous from The Manchurian Candidate, and most likely Peaks is paying homage to it.

*Yes, the Queen of Hearts will come into play late in the second season 'and will be revisited later with Audrey 'but at this point it is doubtful such a story arc was on anyone's mind. It is nice foreshadowing though if Audrey was crowned Miss Twin Peaks and abducted by Windom Earl as his "Queen"for the Black Lodge, as probably would have been the case before the production problems with MacLachlan's eventual refusing of the Cooper/Audrey storyline.

*additional footage of the Audrey/Blackie was shot 'Blackie instructs Audrey on how to prepare for the clients. A bell will ring and Audrey will go to her post. Audrey theorizes that the system is a "bit like school." Blackie agrees with her and reminds her who's in charge.

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Audrey has a brief scene after the first commercial break. She scrutinizes herself in a mirror, removes herself from it, and places herself on a nearby bed and evaluates the room. In terms of the amount of action in the series finale, this quick scene would be a natural to cut. After all, we already know that Audrey is more or less stuck at One Eyed Jacks, and her final moment with Ben would play just as effectively. But what the scene does nicely reinforce are two themes 'duality and the fairy tale. The shot opens on reversed shot of Audrey. It is the image of Audrey in the mirror, preparing herself in costume for her roll. Audrey has worn several masks in the public world, and this is simple preparation for yet another mask. The mirror has been an excellent device for establishing the duality/twin motif in the series 'the first image of the entire adventure is not Laura's body, but Josie's reversed visage in her vanity; Donna and Audrey talk to one another through a bathroom mirror. Leland and Cooper will also gaze into a mirror at particularly horrific moments. And doppelgangers will take the truest form of a mirrored image. Audrey is in essence looking at her duality 'the sexual charms she has used are now at the fore and presented in a straightforward manner 'the costume of a prostitute. It's interesting to observe that Audrey doesn't linger or lose herself in her own image, like Josie does. Instead she is bored by it, and rejects her image with a pout.

She moves away from the mirror 'her part after all is now perfected 'and observes the room. It is a locked room. Audrey acknowledges the voices from the revelers outside and roams to the bed. She places herself on the edge of the bed and studies the room. She is trapped, but always thinking. What her plan is cannot be clear, to us or even Audrey.

The imagery here though is quite strong. The room is an elaborate, baroque red room. The think curtains frame the bed and almost drown Audrey. She is presented in the pure white, and the fairy tale aspect is well represented. The character has now been reduced to a captured princess, and can only wait for her fate. This is perhaps the strongest imagery the series has used for fantasy up to this point, and it recalls the dream world that Cooper has also visited.

Audrey's final scene of the season comes as no surprise. Like most of the major characters, she is left with a cliffhanger 'her father Benjamin has entered her abode to break in the "new girl"and Audrey is trapped and will be found out. It's highly effective, and like most of the other threads, we are on the edge of our seats in anticipation for the resolution. How can Audrey possibly get out of this situation? What the scene does present though in terms of the theme is a reinforcement of the fairy tale motif. The opening reveal is of a close-up of a large Queen of Diamonds playing card being sewn onto Audrey's midriff. And the seamstress appears to be an exaggerated dwarfed hunchback. The inclusion of such a character recalls the type found in Brothers Grimm fables. Also Ben Horne prepares his entrance uttering the words of Prospero, "this is such stuff as dreams are made of" In Shakespeare's The Tempest, father Prospero tells this line to his daughter, and now Ben unbeknownst to him, will tell this to his own daughter. The Tempest takes place on a magical island, and again adds that Audrey is now in the fairy tale world of captured princesses, evil queens, hunchbacks, and other fantastical elements.

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What is interesting to note is the placement of the Audrey cliffhanger in the actual aired program compared to the initial scripted version. From the original draft, her scene happens much earlier before Pete rushes into the burning Mill, before Big Ed finds an unconscious Nadine, and Leo's assault on Bobby. The televised version places Audrey's predicament as the penultimate cliffhanger, climaxing naturally with Agent Cooper being shot. The change in placement milks the suspense for the characters we're meant to be the most concerned with, and has solidified Audrey as the show's undisputed heroine, surpassed only by hero Cooper's unknown fate. In the second season premiere the cliffhangers will be mirrored back 'first dealing with Cooper's ordeal, and then Audrey's.

Audrey is also reinforced in the final moments of the series conclusion. It is Cooper's scene. He has retired for the night, after doing a solid day's work, and with little sleep. However, he notices Audrey's note and smiles at it. "My Special Agent,"he muses to himself, again tying the Audrey/Cooper relationship to the audience. Our hero has the answer to the heroine's fate in his hands, but that also will not be discovered because he answers a knock at his door that could be deadly.

*For the cliffhanger, we're not only left with wondering how Audrey will deal with her father, but also what Ben will do to her if he finds her. It's easy to forget after knowing who the eventual killer is, but at the time Ben Horne was a main suspect to the viewing audience. And with Audrey's admissions that her father "used to sing"to Laura and a hint at his obsession with the dead girl, there's no telling if Ben isn't capable of threatening Audrey's life. Again, will Audrey wind up like Laura?

*Frost has been quoted as having a backup plan if his strategy in creating cliffhanger upon cliffhanger hadn't had worked, and ABC had not picked up Twin Peaks for a second season. It would be interesting to find out what that plan would actually be. As is the clues for Audrey's predicament are only the letter she has slipped under Cooper's door, and her quick glimpse of seeing Cooper at One Eyed Jacks also. It is curious just how much the resolve to Audrey's (and others) situation had been thought about. If you observe the Jacks' boudoir, there aren't any masks hanging on the wall, and therefore must have been thought out after the fact.
Last edited by Audrey Horne on Mon Nov 05, 2007 6:55 pm, edited 4 times in total.
God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?

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