FWWM and relevance to Season 3

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wAtChLaR
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FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby wAtChLaR » Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:08 pm

so i didn't know where to put this post so....
a colleague at work is currently watching seasons 1 & 2 again and DVRing Season 3 for later viewing. they haven't seen the series since it's initial run
i let them know they need to watch FWWM before watching season 3.
she said, i saw that and didn't like it...too weird

my answer:

you may have difficulties with season 3 then...
she's going to watch it again...but i don't hold out hope once episode 3 hits that she'll stick with it
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Re: FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby Cipher » Fri Jul 14, 2017 4:03 pm

My first words to a friend after the premier of parts 1-4 was that people who didn't like Fire Walk With Me were going to hate Season 3.

I guess it'll be interesting to see if that holds true for your friend?

Personally, I think Peaks is so vastly elevated by Fire Walk With Me that I can't imagine the series without it.
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Re: FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby wAtChLaR » Fri Jul 14, 2017 7:40 pm

Cipher wrote:My first words to a friend after the premier of parts 1-4 was that people who didn't like Fire Walk With Me were going to hate Season 3.

I guess it'll be interesting to see if that holds true for your friend?

Personally, I think Peaks is so vastly elevated by Fire Walk With Me that I can't imagine the series without it.

i can't either
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Re: FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby Framed_Angel » Sat Jul 15, 2017 9:08 pm

I re-watched FWWM just ahead of S3 premiere. I hadn't seen it in a while, so I like to think I had a fresh objective view on it.
Your colleague could be put off by any number of things that resonated as "weird." For one: the two-stories-within-one-movie. Agents Desmond & Stanley dominate the early part, "Lil"'s intro was pretty darn weird; then we're abruptly transitioned to Gordon Cole's interlude with Cooper and Jeffries. Plenty of 'weird' packed into that brief time.

I noticed moments like Laura's "Gobble gobble" to James that were real head scratchers. At Teresa's trailer with Carl Rodd, when the old lady holding a icepack to her eye just pops in and back out without a word.

Lots of exposition or revealing what was up w/ Teresa Banks, then when we finally meet her it's not for very long. We hardly get to know her, so she feels like a mere device. Mike's yelling out the truck about the creamed corn I badly wanted to sync w/ my earlier apprisal of references to garmanbozia, etc; but was more baffled by Laura entering these states of wild-eyed reaction both to Harold and to her father's behavior in the car.

Then, the final action where we see how she died kind of wrapped into the final 30 minutes and seemed to move almost too quickly. Angel suspended in the red room, her laughing at the end -- I can kind of relate to someone's viewing it only once and feeling bewilderment! I was fascinated with the red room scene showing Bob, Leland, because the subtle jazz music in the background seemed such an odd juxtaposition with their behavior. And the coffeecup Dale pours twice, one time it's all viscous or hardened -- no explanation.

But I've come to appreciate FWWM for its parts rather than the whole, and for helping me understand a little better what we're watching now in S3, since both are predominantly Lynch's vision. I'd encourage your friend to watch Mulholland Drive too if she hasn't recently; it's another story-within-a-story, and like with any visual artist whose work is complex, I find the more I check into other works by the painter the more it helps me understand the one I'm fixated on figuring out.
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Re: FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby wAtChLaR » Mon Jul 17, 2017 6:06 pm

Framed_Angel wrote:I re-watched FWWM just ahead of S3 premiere. I hadn't seen it in a while, so I like to think I had a fresh objective view on it.
Your colleague could be put off by any number of things that resonated as "weird." For one: the two-stories-within-one-movie. Agents Desmond & Stanley dominate the early part, "Lil"'s intro was pretty darn weird; then we're abruptly transitioned to Gordon Cole's interlude with Cooper and Jeffries. Plenty of 'weird' packed into that brief time.

I noticed moments like Laura's "Gobble gobble" to James that were real head scratchers. At Teresa's trailer with Carl Rodd, when the old lady holding a icepack to her eye just pops in and back out without a word.

Lots of exposition or revealing what was up w/ Teresa Banks, then when we finally meet her it's not for very long. We hardly get to know her, so she feels like a mere device. Mike's yelling out the truck about the creamed corn I badly wanted to sync w/ my earlier apprisal of references to garmanbozia, etc; but was more baffled by Laura entering these states of wild-eyed reaction both to Harold and to her father's behavior in the car.

Then, the final action where we see how she died kind of wrapped into the final 30 minutes and seemed to move almost too quickly. Angel suspended in the red room, her laughing at the end -- I can kind of relate to someone's viewing it only once and feeling bewilderment! I was fascinated with the red room scene showing Bob, Leland, because the subtle jazz music in the background seemed such an odd juxtaposition with their behavior. And the coffeecup Dale pours twice, one time it's all viscous or hardened -- no explanation.

But I've come to appreciate FWWM for its parts rather than the whole, and for helping me understand a little better what we're watching now in S3, since both are predominantly Lynch's vision. I'd encourage your friend to watch Mulholland Drive too if she hasn't recently; it's another story-within-a-story, and like with any visual artist whose work is complex, I find the more I check into other works by the painter the more it helps me understand the one I'm fixated on figuring out.


yes to all of this....and she saw it in 92....i told her watch again and just sense as a therapist....don't try to understand...FWWM is the most amazing meditation on the nightmare of incest and the power of denial

something society was not yet ready for in 1992......i think we are now
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Re: FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby nick1218 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:40 pm

Framed_Angel wrote:I re-watched FWWM just ahead of S3 premiere. I hadn't seen it in a while, so I like to think I had a fresh objective view on it.
Your colleague could be put off by any number of things that resonated as "weird." For one: the two-stories-within-one-movie. Agents Desmond & Stanley dominate the early part, "Lil"'s intro was pretty darn weird; then we're abruptly transitioned to Gordon Cole's interlude with Cooper and Jeffries. Plenty of 'weird' packed into that brief time.

I noticed moments like Laura's "Gobble gobble" to James that were real head scratchers. At Teresa's trailer with Carl Rodd, when the old lady holding a icepack to her eye just pops in and back out without a word.

Lots of exposition or revealing what was up w/ Teresa Banks, then when we finally meet her it's not for very long. We hardly get to know her, so she feels like a mere device. Mike's yelling out the truck about the creamed corn I badly wanted to sync w/ my earlier apprisal of references to garmanbozia, etc; but was more baffled by Laura entering these states of wild-eyed reaction both to Harold and to her father's behavior in the car.

Then, the final action where we see how she died kind of wrapped into the final 30 minutes and seemed to move almost too quickly. Angel suspended in the red room, her laughing at the end -- I can kind of relate to someone's viewing it only once and feeling bewilderment! I was fascinated with the red room scene showing Bob, Leland, because the subtle jazz music in the background seemed such an odd juxtaposition with their behavior. And the coffeecup Dale pours twice, one time it's all viscous or hardened -- no explanation.

But I've come to appreciate FWWM for its parts rather than the whole, and for helping me understand a little better what we're watching now in S3, since both are predominantly Lynch's vision. I'd encourage your friend to watch Mulholland Drive too if she hasn't recently; it's another story-within-a-story, and like with any visual artist whose work is complex, I find the more I check into other works by the painter the more it helps me understand the one I'm fixated on figuring out.


the lady with the icepack kid of looks like a "woodswoman"
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Re: FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby TPDpz » Thu Aug 24, 2017 5:35 am

I watched S1 & S2 when I was around 13 when they aired the first time and a couple of re-runs after that. I loved the mystery, the audiovisual atmosphere and all the mystical parts of the series from lodges, giants, indian myths and spirits. I guess it influenced me a lot on what would become my interests.

When years later I watched FWWM for the first time I was like how boring is this, it was lacking the atmosphere it was lacking the mystical parts for the casual viewer. The mystery had already been solved and I didn't much care how Laura's story arch had developed to the point of the murder. I still don't like the movie itself that much and I don't like the missing parts either. But I know and understand now that there are crucial hints to the world of TP in it that forces me to look in to it and only that makes it interesting. They are not for people who think in single or even dual layers that much, but they provide much for people who love to get provoked and notice and pick up interesting stuff that like to dwell in to the world of TP much deeper.

I have liked season 3 a lot. But then again I have also grown as a viewer from a more simplistic one to someone who picks up details, understands human psyche, makes up connections, speculates a lot within myself and enjoy all that stuff in comparison to the one that first saw FWWM.

ps. I am also still to read the secret history of TP, which I knew nothing of until I found out this forum as of late.

[EDIT]

I'm taking a closer look at FWWM now after watching S3 as well. I must say that I am picking up a lot more details that are intriguing to myself, surely stuff that others have picked up during the years already as I never liked FWWM so much, I still don't know do I like the movie itself or am I just over the moon with the information it provides.

Seen 2 possible woodsmen creatures so far at 23min. One in the Hap's diner where the lights are flashing with Jack and then the Granny as shown in pictures below. I really think she is one as her face is covered in dirt of some sort as well. She's hiding her right eye to show only one, like representing the all seeing eye and spying out what is going on in that house. She hisses out when Desmond talks to her and backs off like she couldn't bear him.

We'll see. Maybe this really grows on to you. It's like Lynch said in his long youtube video on consciousness. If you have a golf ball size consciousness you have a golf ball size understanding and that there is a vast ocean of it within reach for each of us. When your consciousness grows your understanding grows. I understand this movie now a lot better.

[EDIT 2]

I'm 66min in the movie now and there's definately more happening than I recalled. I never liked the first 33min part much before, but after S3 this is really nice. Connecting the stuff with the trailer park and all. So Desmond vanished to the black lodge by taking the ring beneath the trailer and Coop warned Laura about that in a dream when the ring was seen in the lodge on a table. I also did not remember that Laura said BOB had been having her since she was 12 and in this movie she first time connected the dots that it's really his father. At one point Leland also clearly fights off the possession to go to say Laura that he loves her. There's really much more than I recalled. The tiny segments of lodge stuff is also more providing now than it felt then.

[EDIT 3]

Finished it. Much better than I recalled that remastered version at least. I was mostly interested in the first part that was before really irrelevant to me somehow and did not provide answers to the lodge stuff I wanted to know. Now after S3 underway it was really nice. The part with Laura also was nicer than the last time I saw it and I had remembered several things wrong so it was a good thing to check it out. I watched missing parts just prior to S3 airing but need to watch that again to fill in some stuff related to FWWM there.

A couple things really stroke me like the question about space to Laura and her answer to it. Also the part in the bar with Donna, I so know how they felt there but at the same sense I know that dreadful emptiness Laura wanted to save Donna from. It's a nice place to take some walks on the wild side, but to get spiraled down to that empty world, void of any love, it's a horror to describe. I've been there and was lost for a long time, but found my way back.
Last edited by TPDpz on Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:11 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: FWWM and relevance to Season 3

Postby Novalis » Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:03 am

nick1218 wrote:the lady with the icepack kid of looks like a "woodswoman"



I've been thinking this too, since part 8. And the thing about holding an icepack to her soot-covered face is that it may indicate that she's trying to soothe some kind of burning sensation (rather than an ache). She's also elderly and infirm (has a walking stick iirc), and doesn't speak as such, just shaking her head. It wouldn't be too much of a stretch to imagine her asking 'gotta light?' although the menacing atmosphere in this scene seems more to accompany her than to emanate from her; she seems more afraid, and bearing fear, than someone to be afraid of per se.

Her approach to the trailer is accompanied by the same unsettling music and zooming camera motion that follows the telegraph wires around -- it's as if she materialises at the door rather than walks there. Also notable is that Curious Woman is dressed in the same dilapidated style as the woodsmen.

Maybe Curious Woman was, taken together with Prochnow and Brisbin's washed-faced woodsmen in the convenience store scene, a prototype in Lynch's evolving ideas. The dirty/sooty face he has certainly reused (and it occurs in MD's Bum), but merged it with the big beards and woollen hats (and general 'hobo couture') of the FWWM woodsmen to create new woodsmen in The Return that are like final versions.

EDIT: image added for clarity

Image
As a matter of fact, 'Chalfont' was the name of the people that rented this space before. Two Chalfonts. Weird, huh?

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