Episode 8 (Season 2 Premiere)

Moderators: Annie, BookhouseBoyBob, Ross, Jerry Horne, Brad D

claaa7
Posts: 715
Joined: Sun Oct 19, 2014 2:47 am

Re: Episode 8 (Season 2 Premiere)

Postby claaa7 » Wed Aug 09, 2017 12:06 am

Jonah wrote:The main problem with this episode is probably that it's overlong and, as has been pointed out, has a lot of recaps. However, I think the recapping is mostly done in a stylish way, such as the long, lingering shot of donuts, interspersed with trees and other footage, is a great moment. This episode is full of great stuff - a lot of wonderful highlights, including the Briggs scene, the aforementioned donuts scene, the opening scene, the closing scene, so much good stuff - but I agree it does drag a little and some parts don't fully work or are overplayed. Overall, though, I think it's a great episode.


completely agree about the juxtaposition of the donuts and coffee with the grimness of the murder scene - really a great metaphor for the series as a whole. the way all the information is presented must have been in large part to make new viewers have a chance to catch on to Season 2 and as you say it's mostly done in a stylish way. some of the hospital scenes do drag a little but overall it is one of my favorite episodes as well... i especially love the whole ending with the Palmer and Hayward's dinner followed by Ronette's flashback of the train car. Mesmerizing stuff!
Snailhead
Posts: 547
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2016 2:45 pm

Re: Episode 8 (Season 2 Premiere)

Postby Snailhead » Wed Aug 09, 2017 11:55 am

Pacing wise, this episode seems to resemble The Return the most out of the original run.
User avatar
Mr. Reindeer
Posts: 2806
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:09 pm

Re: Episode 8 (Season 2 Premiere)

Postby Mr. Reindeer » Sat Apr 11, 2020 9:15 pm

Both of those Giant scenes are wonderful to revisit, realizing where the alliance (if that’s even the right word) between Cooper and the Giant/Fireman will go. Since the Waiter and Giant are “one and the same,” the Waiter’s repeated line, “I’ve heard about you,” takes on new significance now that we know Cooper is already Blue Rose at this point. It can be read as the Lodge spirits letting Cooper know that they’ve become aware of his explorations into their world, and perhaps even as a sign of respect/compliment.

I’ve never understood the scolding finger-wag Coop gives the Waiter, but it cracks me up every time.

“Think of me as a friend,” the Giant says. Is he, though? Just as Mike (post-arm loss) seemed to be a relatively benevolent figure on the original series before FWWM complicated things, the Giant’s relationship with humanity in general and Cooper in particular seems slightly more murky post-TR. Although I think he does still come off as a largely “good” spirit in TR, there are lingering questions about where Cooper went wrong in P17 and P18, and how on-book or off-book he went from the Fireman’s guidelines (the Fireman does mention Richard and Linda in P1, after all).

“The question is, where have you gone?” Given the nonlinear nature of the Lodge spirits’ existences, I like to consider that this line refers to the Fireman not being able to find Cooper after he enters the pocket universe (or whatever you want to call it) in P18.

“We want to help you.” “Who’s we?” Who indeed? The Fireman and Dido? Fireman and others we haven’t met yet? He speaks about what he is “permitted” to say. Does he have a White Lodge version of Judy (or the “devilish one”) governing his actions? Or is there just some general code the spirits must adhere to?

It also always cracks me up that after being super-cryptic, the Giant offers the very practical and ridiculously obvious advice, “You will require medical attention.” Struycken’s comic timing is impeccable.

I’ve always loved how genuinely sinister and volatile Jerry is throughout this episode. I wish we’d seen more of that side of the character. DPK plays it so well, while still remaining charming and funny.

We learned of Dale’s obsession with investigating decades-old deaths that have ostensibly been solved in E1, with Marilyn and JFK. Now, among his dying wishes is a desire to “crack” the Lindbergh baby case, which took place decades before Dale was even born, and for which the alleged perpetrator received the death penalty! This wonderfully foreshadows his time-traveling attempt at historical revision in P17. He just can’t let things be, he can’t accept that a mystery has been solved and the wrongdoers have been punished. He always has to keep pushing.

Dale mentions in his tape to Diane that he wore his bulletproof vest in compliance with FBI protocols when operating undercover. Once again, I wonder exactly how much he told her and Gordon about his excursion to One-Eyed Jacks, given what a violation of his professional code it was to cross the border.

The Maddy/Sarah scene seems to have been a Lynch touch. In the script, the dream Maddy recounts to Sarah involves traveling across a desert with a giant cat (?!), and the scene ends uneventfully after Leland’s exit. In a later scene with Donna, Maddy has a vision of Bob. Lynch seems to have combined the two scenes, and conceived the weird carpet effect instead of doing another Bob vision. I’ve seen it described as a spreading bloodstain, but to my eye it simply looks like a depression in the carpet, as if something invisible were being dragged across it. The location seems to roughly correspond to where Sarah is lying drugged when Leland murders Maddy (the furniture was moved around from episode to episode—e.g., the record player was only on set when it was called for in the scene—but it is the same physical spot on the set, give or take a few feet). More broadly, it stems from Lynch’s interest in finding horror in the mundane (see also drawer pulls). I’m also noticing, watching the early episodes in light of TR, that Lynch’s episodes often seem to focus on the idea of something being very wrong about the Palmer house in general—beyond the presence of Bob and Judy and frogmoths and who knows what else, there is a sense of the house itself being extremely ominous (which pays off in P18). Lynch did a series of paintings around this same time with titles like “Suddenly My House Became a Tree of Sores,” and he has discussed his belief that abstract dangers and horrors that come from within a home are more frightening than any threat from outside of it. In a way, the Palmer house itself seems to have absorbed and come to embody the terrors that took place inside of it, in the same way that all homes ultimately take on the character of the residents.

All the Bobby/Shelly stuff is so bittersweet, knowing where they end up. When he tells her “You’re my girl,” it’s poignant. We know they don’t stay together as a couple up to the present day, and yet they have a child together and in a way, their blissful young love has evolved into a more mature partnership by TR. I think their bond by the time of the TR ended up being a lot stronger than I ever expected it to be, and in retrospect it feels really earned.

Garland’s speech has always been one of my absolute favorite moments of the whole series, and it resonates even more now that we know he only had a few weeks of life left, and that Bobby would end up taking a path that absolutely validates Garland’s “optimism and confidence.” This dream is also presumably Garland’s first contact with the White Lodge, foreshadowing the strange incomprehensible journey that is to come for his character in S2 and TR. It’s almost like the Lodge is reassuring him that Bobby will be alright, and that it’s time to let go of this life and embrace his destiny in whatever world he ends up in.

Throughout season 1, following E2, the sheriff’s station conference room blackboard has the Tibet map posted on it. Beginning with this episode, it has a recreation of Lynch’s iconic map of Twin Peaks (which, according to legend, he initially drew on a napkin while he and Mark described the town).

That scene with Hank and the Hornes is as good as Mulkey ever was in the show. He holds his own really wonderfully with the always-great Beymer and DPK. Lynch wisely plays Hank’s stoic stillness against the Hornes’ shark-like constant movement. I love the way Hank finally breaks into a smile at the end of the scene, after he’s succeeded in pissing off both the Horne brothers.

The names of the Peaks themselves are rarely if ever mentioned on the show. I believe this is the first time Blue Pine Lodge is mentioned by name onscreen, when Harry answers the phone.

Nance is really good doing the smoke inhalation material. He really makes you feel it at the beginning of that scene. Also, it goes without saying that Sherilyn is beyond great in that last scene. The innocence she conveys is so beautiful, and all the sadder now that we know where her devotion to Cooper gets her.

It’s also sad to hear Gersten talk about how successful all the Hayward girls are as kids, in light of how they end up. In a way this episode can be seen as beginning Donna’s downfall (as recounted in TFD), trying to emulate Laura (or her warped perception of Laura) and be some film noir glamour model instead of being herself. At least Harriet seems to have had a fulfilling life, becoming a successful pediatrician, according to TFD.

Note that Sarah is not drinking her S3 go-to drink, the Bloody Mary, at the dinner party. She seems to have an old fashioned.

It’s a little odd that Blue Rose Task Force veteran Dale Cooper (who a few days earlier blindly trusted his Red Room dream) is so skeptical that the Giant encounter was real, even after his ring disappeared and two of the Giant’s clues already paid off!

It’s been noted before by both me and others, but the Giant/Fireman relays axioms involving the words “one stone” in both this episode and in P1, whatever that may mean. And the golden orb he places in Cooper in this episode of course evokes P8 (or vice versa).

Finally, this episode’s edition of Dale’s Diet:
— The room service Waiter delivers the warm milk Dale ordered in Episode 7 (Cooper never drinks it due to being shot)
— Planning the sheriff’s station meeting, Truman asks: “Jelly donuts?” Cooper: “Harry, that goes without saying.”
— In the sheriff’s station conference room, Cooper has coffee in his FBI mug, and takes a jelly donut from the stack (he is never seen eating it)

It cracks me up that Albert also has an FBI mug in that scene. It’s apparently strict protocol that no agent should ever travel without having his standard-issue Bureau mug with him at all times.
Last edited by Mr. Reindeer on Sun Apr 12, 2020 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Saturn's child
Posts: 394
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2016 4:38 pm
Location: Blue Mountains

Re: Episode 8 (Season 2 Premiere)

Postby Saturn's child » Sun Apr 12, 2020 10:03 am

Loving reading your rewatch commentary Reindeer, many thanks!

Mr. Reindeer wrote:It’s been noted before by both me and others, but the Giant/Fireman relays axioms involving the words “one stone” in both this episode and in P1, whatever that may mean.


I'm sure this was not intended at all, but 'one stone' reminds me of the philosopher's stone, which ties in with the alchemical themes that occasionally surface or may be read into Peaks. "My log is turning to gold" & didn't Lynch have an artwork referencing a 'machine turning to gold'?


Mr. Reindeer wrote:It cracks me up that Albert also has an FBI mug in that scene. It’s apparently strict protocol that no agent should ever travel without having his standard-issue Bureau mug with him at all times.


:lol: I love the Peaks/Lynchian take on the FBI.
User avatar
Saturn's child
Posts: 394
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2016 4:38 pm
Location: Blue Mountains

Re: Episode 8 (Season 2 Premiere)

Postby Saturn's child » Sun Apr 12, 2020 10:08 am

(just looked it up: "infuse the machine with gold", used at a festival of disruption)
User avatar
Mr. Reindeer
Posts: 2806
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:09 pm

Re: Episode 8 (Season 2 Premiere)

Postby Mr. Reindeer » Tue Apr 14, 2020 11:25 am

Saturn's child wrote:Loving reading your rewatch commentary Reindeer, many thanks!

Mr. Reindeer wrote:It’s been noted before by both me and others, but the Giant/Fireman relays axioms involving the words “one stone” in both this episode and in P1, whatever that may mean.


I'm sure this was not intended at all, but 'one stone' reminds me of the philosopher's stone, which ties in with the alchemical themes that occasionally surface or may be read into Peaks. "My log is turning to gold" & didn't Lynch have an artwork referencing a 'machine turning to gold'?


It also just occurred to me that the two phrases have somewhat opposite meanings. In the former, “a path is formed by laying one stone at a time,” the message is to proceed slowly and with attention to detail. In the latter, “two birds with one stone” (which may have originally come from Cooper rather than the Fireman—Gordon says this was the last thing Coop said to him before disappearing), the message is the exact opposite: get two things done expeditiously. Hmm.

Return to “Season 2 (1990-1991)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests